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dc.contributor.authorStevenson, LA
dc.contributor.authorAlford, RA
dc.contributor.authorBell, SC
dc.contributor.authorRoznik, EA
dc.contributor.authorBerger, L
dc.contributor.authorPike, DA
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-10T00:33:45Z
dc.date.available2020-12-10T00:33:45Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-04
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-13-21266
dc.identifier.citationStevenson, L. A., Alford, R. A., Bell, S. C., Roznik, E. A., Berger, L. & Pike, D. A. (2013). Variation in Thermal Performance of a Widespread Pathogen, the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. PLOS ONE, 8 (9), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0073830.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/253516
dc.description.abstractRates of growth and reproduction of the pathogens that cause emerging infectious diseases can be affected by local environmental conditions; these conditions can thus influence the strength and nature of disease outbreaks. An understanding of these relationships is important for understanding disease ecology and developing mitigation strategies. Widespread emergence of the fungal disease chytridiomycosis has had devastating effects on amphibian populations. The causative pathogen, Batrachochytriumdendrobatidis (Bd), is sensitive to temperature, but its thermal tolerances are not well studied. We examined the thermal responses of three Bd isolates collected across a latitudinal gradient in eastern Australia. Temperature affected all aspects of Bd growth and reproduction that we measured, in ways that often differed among Bd isolates. Aspects of growth, reproduction, and their relationships to temperature that differed among isolates included upper thermal maxima for growth (26, 27, or 28 °C, depending on the isolate), relationships between zoospore production and temperature, and zoospore activity and temperature. Two isolates decreased zoospore production as temperature increased, whereas the third isolate was less fecund overall, but did not show a strong response to temperature until reaching the upper limit of its thermal tolerance. Our results show differentiation in life-history traits among isolates within Australia, suggesting that the pathogen may exhibit local adaptation. An understanding of how environmental temperatures can limit pathogens by constraining fitness will enhance our ability to assess pathogen dynamics in the field, model pathogen spread, and conduct realistic experiments on host susceptibility and disease transmission.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleVariation in Thermal Performance of a Widespread Pathogen, the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0073830
melbourne.affiliation.departmentVeterinary Biosciences
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume8
melbourne.source.issue9
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1365749
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24023908
melbourne.contributor.authorBerger, Lee
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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