Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLaverty, AA
dc.contributor.authorPalladino, R
dc.contributor.authorLee, JT
dc.contributor.authorMillett, C
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-10T01:28:37Z
dc.date.available2020-12-10T01:28:37Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-20
dc.identifierpii: 10.1186/s12966-015-0223-3
dc.identifier.citationLaverty, A. A., Palladino, R., Lee, J. T. & Millett, C. (2015). Associations between active travel and weight, blood pressure and diabetes in six middle income countries: a cross-sectional study in older adults. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 12 (1), https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-015-0223-3.
dc.identifier.issn1479-5868
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/253716
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: There is little published data on the potential health benefits of active travel in low and middle-income countries. This is despite increasing levels of adiposity being linked to increases in physical inactivity and non-communicable diseases. This study will examine: (1) socio-demographic correlates of using active travel (walking or cycling for transport) among older adults in six populous middle-income countries (2) whether use of active travel is associated with adiposity, systolic blood pressure and self-reported diabetes in these countries. METHODS: Data are from the WHO Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) of China, India, Mexico, Ghana, Russia and South Africa with a total sample size of 40,477. Correlates of active travel (≥150 min/week) were examined using logistic regression. Logistic and linear regression analyses were used to examine health related outcomes according to three groups of active travel use per week. RESULTS: 46.4% of the sample undertook ≥150 min of active travel per week (range South Africa: 21.9% Ghana: 57.8%). In pooled analyses those in wealthier households were less likely to meet this level of active travel (Adjusted Risk Ratio (ARR) 0.77, 95% Confidence Intervals 0.67; 0.88 wealthiest fifth vs. poorest). Older people and women were also less likely to use active travel for ≥150 min per week (ARR 0.71, 0.62; 0.80 those aged 70+ years vs. 18-29 years old, ARR 0.82, 0.74; 0.91 women vs. men). In pooled fully adjusted analyses, high use of active travel was associated with lower risk of overweight (ARR 0.71, 0.59; 0.86), high waist-to-hip ratio (ARR 0.71, 0.61; 0.84) and lower BMI (-0.54 kg/m(2), -0.98;- 0.11). Moderate (31-209 min/week) and high use (≥210 min/week) of active travel was associated with lower waist circumference (-1.52 cm (-2.40; -0.65) and -2.16 cm (3.07; -1.26)), and lower systolic blood pressure (-1.63 mm/Hg (-3.19; -0.06) and -2.33 mm/Hg (-3.98; -0.69)). CONCLUSIONS: In middle-income countries use of active travel for ≥150 min per week is more common in lower socio-economic groups and appears to confer similar health benefits to those identified in high-income settings. Efforts to increase active travel levels should be integral to strategies to maintain healthy weight and reduce disease burden in these settings.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMC
dc.titleAssociations between active travel and weight, blood pressure and diabetes in six middle income countries: a cross-sectional study in older adults
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12966-015-0223-3
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.source.titleInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
melbourne.source.volume12
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1325330
melbourne.contributor.authorLee, Ta-Yu
dc.identifier.eissn1479-5868
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record