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dc.contributor.authorTemple, JB
dc.contributor.authorKelaher, M
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, R
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-10T04:40:06Z
dc.date.available2020-12-10T04:40:06Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-07
dc.identifierpii: S1041610218001722
dc.identifier.citationTemple, J. B., Kelaher, M. & Williams, R. (2018). Disability discrimination and avoidance in later life: prevalence, disability differentials and association with mental health. International Psychogeriatrics, 31 (9), pp.1319-1329. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1041610218001722.
dc.identifier.issn1041-6102
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/253840
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT: Background:Later life is a period of increased risk of disability, but there is little quantitative evidence regarding the exclusion of older people (through discrimination and avoidance) due to their health conditions. This study aims to (1) measure the prevalence of disability exclusion in later life, (2) examine how experiences of exclusion differ by disability type, and (3) investigate the association of exposure to exclusion with psychological distress. METHODS: Using data from the 2015 ABS Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers, we calculated the prevalence of people aged 55 years and over with a disability experiencing discrimination and engaging in avoidance behaviors, disaggregated by 18 detailed disability types. Modified Log-Poisson models were fitted to estimate Prevalence Ratios to measure the association between exclusion and psychological distress, stratified by disability type. RESULTS: In 2015, about 5% of Australians aged 55 years and over with a disability reported experiencing an instance of disability discrimination, and one in four reported avoiding a situation or context due to their disability. Accounting for psychosocial comorbidities and with extensive demographic controls, exposure to disability avoidance (PR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.7, 2.1) or discrimination (PR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.4, 2.1) almost doubled the probability of experiencing psychological distress. Effects were heightened for individuals reporting specific disabilities including sensory and speech and physical disabilities as well as those reporting a head injury, stroke, or acquired brain injury. CONCLUSIONS: Despite protections against disability discrimination in legislation, discrimination and avoidance due to disability is prevalent and is associated with poor mental health outcomes.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Press (CUP)
dc.titleDisability discrimination and avoidance in later life: prevalence, disability differentials and association with mental health
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1041610218001722
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.source.titleInternational Psychogeriatrics
melbourne.source.volume31
melbourne.source.issue9
melbourne.source.pages1319-1329
melbourne.elementsid1360182
melbourne.contributor.authorTemple, Jeromey
melbourne.contributor.authorKelaher, Margaret
melbourne.contributor.authorWilliams, Ruth
dc.identifier.eissn1741-203X
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidUNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES, CE1101029
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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