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dc.contributor.authorOsborne, Mark Ian
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-10T07:16:01Z
dc.date.available2020-12-10T07:16:01Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/253863
dc.description© 2020 Mark Ian Osborne
dc.description.abstractThe educational architecture that has been built in New Zealand since 2011 has predominately been in the style of innovative learning environments (ILEs). While ILEs potentially offer teachers access to a wider range of teaching and learning approaches and more collaboration opportunities than traditional classrooms they also often require significant shifts in teacher practice to be successful. Leadership is often seen as an important factor in the successful implementation of such environments but there is very little research into the specific change leadership practices principals can employ to successfully transition their schools to ILEs. As part of the Australian Research Council-funded Innovative Learning Environments and Teacher Change project (ILETC) an analytic autoethnographic study was undertaken to identify the change leadership practices that are most likely to lead to a successful ILE implementation. A literature review was undertaken, the key findings from which were used to develop a conceptual framework. This framework was then used in a series of interactive interviews with New Zealand primary school principals to compare their personal experience (and those of the researcher) with change leadership principles in research literature. This joint sense-making was complemented by a range of other data sources including field notes, workshop artefacts, workshop transcripts, memories and recollections. Two ‘key informants’ (recognised experts in the field) were also used throughout the research process to support sense-making. The findings outline two sets of change leadership principles; a set that are important to uphold throughout the entire change process (persistent principles); and a set that are important (respectively) in the preparing, implementing and sustaining phases of a change (phase-dependent principles). These principles, when intelligently and sensitively applied by school leaders throughout the innovative learning environment implementation, will increase the likelihood a transition to ILEs will be successful, ultimately leading to improved learning and well-being outcomes for teachers and students.
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dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectEducational Leadership
dc.subjectChange Leadership
dc.subjectChange management
dc.subjectInnovative Learning Environments
dc.subjectLearning Environments
dc.titleChange leadership when implementing innovative learning environments
dc.typePhD thesis
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Graduate School of Education
melbourne.thesis.supervisornameWesley Imms
melbourne.contributor.authorOsborne, Mark Ian
melbourne.thesis.supervisorothernameBenjamin Cleveland
melbourne.tes.fieldofresearch1399999 Other education not elsewhere classified
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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