Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGonzalez-Blanch, C
dc.contributor.authorMedrano, LA
dc.contributor.authorBendall, S
dc.contributor.authorD'Alfonso, S
dc.contributor.authorCagliarini, D
dc.contributor.authorMcEnery, C
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, S
dc.contributor.authorValentine, L
dc.contributor.authorGleeson, JF
dc.contributor.authorAlvarez-Jimenez, M
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-14T06:34:36Z
dc.date.available2020-12-14T06:34:36Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-01
dc.identifierpii: S0924933820000905
dc.identifier.citationGonzalez-Blanch, C., Medrano, L. A., Bendall, S., D'Alfonso, S., Cagliarini, D., McEnery, C., O'Sullivan, S., Valentine, L., Gleeson, J. F. & Alvarez-Jimenez, M. (2020). The role of social relatedness and self-beliefs in social functioning in first-episode psychosis: Are we overestimating the contribution of illness-related factors?. EUROPEAN PSYCHIATRY, 63 (1), https://doi.org/10.1192/j.eurpsy.2020.90.
dc.identifier.issn0924-9338
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/254261
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Numerous research studies have demonstrated an association between higher symptom severity and cognitive impairment with poorer social functioning in first-episode psychosis (FEP). By contrast, the influence of subjective experiences, such as social relatedness and self-beliefs, has received less attention. Consequently, a cohesive understanding of how these variables interact to influence social functioning is lacking. METHOD: We used structural equation modeling to examine the direct and indirect relationships among neurocognition (processing speed) and social cognition, symptoms, and social relatedness (perceived social support and loneliness) and self-beliefs (self-efficacy and self-esteem) in 170 individuals with FEP. RESULTS: The final model yielded an acceptable model fit (χ2 = 45.48, comparative fit index = 0.96; goodness of fit index = 0.94; Tucker-Lewis index = 0.94; root mean square error of approximation = 0.06) and explained 45% of social functioning. Negative symptoms, social relatedness, and self-beliefs exerted a direct effect on social functioning. Social relatedness partially mediated the impact of social cognition and negative symptoms on social functioning. Self-beliefs also mediated the relationship between social relatedness and social functioning. CONCLUSIONS: The observed associations highlight the potential value of targeting social relatedness and self-beliefs to improve functional outcomes in FEP. Explanatory models of social functioning in FEP not accounting for social relatedness and self-beliefs might be overestimating the effect of the illness-related factors.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherCAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleThe role of social relatedness and self-beliefs in social functioning in first-episode psychosis: Are we overestimating the contribution of illness-related factors?
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/j.eurpsy.2020.90
melbourne.affiliation.departmentCentre for Youth Mental Health
melbourne.affiliation.departmentComputing and Information Systems
melbourne.source.titleEuropean Psychiatry
melbourne.source.volume63
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1467911
melbourne.openaccess.urlhttp://doi.org/10.1192/j.eurpsy.2020.90
melbourne.openaccess.statusPublished version
melbourne.contributor.authorBendall, Catherine
melbourne.contributor.authorD'Alfonso, Simon
melbourne.contributor.authorAlvarez, Mario
melbourne.contributor.authorCagliarini, Daniela
melbourne.contributor.authorGleeson, John
melbourne.contributor.authorMcEnery, Carla
melbourne.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Shaunagh
melbourne.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Shaunagh
melbourne.contributor.authorValentine, Lee
dc.identifier.eissn1778-3585
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record