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dc.contributor.authorBiddulph, S
dc.contributor.editorBiddulph, S
dc.contributor.editorRosenzweig, J
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-15T00:57:17Z
dc.date.available2020-12-15T00:57:17Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationBiddulph, S. (2019). Arbitrary Detention. Biddulph, S (Ed.). Rosenzweig, J (Ed.). Handbook on Human Rights in China, (1), pp.371-396. Edward Elgar Publishing.
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-78643-367-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/254291
dc.description.abstractThe right to personal liberty is often described as one of the most fundamental human rights in light of its connection to an individual’s physical freedom. The right has a long history in both the common and civil law traditions and has been recognized as part of customary international law (Human Rights Council 2012, A/HRC/22/44, para. 79). From this right derives the expectation that individuals may not be detained or imprisoned without justification.
dc.publisherEdward Elgar Publishing
dc.titleArbitrary Detention
dc.typeChapter
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Law School
melbourne.source.titleHandbook on Human Rights in China
melbourne.source.pages371-396
melbourne.identifier.arcFT130100412
melbourne.elementsid1439457
pubs.edition1
melbourne.contributor.authorBiddulph, Sarah
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidAUST RESEARCH COUNCIL, FT130100412
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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