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dc.contributor.authorBiddulph, S
dc.contributor.editorNesossi, E
dc.contributor.editorBiddulph, S
dc.contributor.editorSapio, F
dc.contributor.editorTrevaskes, S
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-15T04:25:30Z
dc.date.available2020-12-15T04:25:30Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationBiddulph, S. (2016). What to Make of the Abolition of Re-Education Through Labour?. Nesossi, E (Ed.). Biddulph, S (Ed.). Sapio, F (Ed.). Trevaskes, S (Ed.). Legal Reforms and Deprivation of Liberty in Contemporary China, Legal Reforms and Deprivation of Liberty in Contemporary China, (1), pp.23-42. Routledge.
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4724-7939-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/254298
dc.description.abstractIn 1979 two of the first laws to be passed in the People’s Republic of China’s (PRC) era of reform and opening up were the Criminal Law (Xing Fa) and the Criminal Procedure Law (Xingshi Susong Fa) 1979. Whilst a number of legislative instruments had been in place prior to 1979 that authorised arrest and criminal punishment, this was the first time in the history of the PRC that comprehensive codes of criminal law and procedure had been passed. Of course, the lack of legislation had not prevented the dispensation of criminal justice.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.titleWhat to Make of the Abolition of Re-Education Through Labour?
dc.typeChapter
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Law School
melbourne.source.titleLegal Reforms and Deprivation of Liberty in Contemporary China
melbourne.source.pages23-42
melbourne.identifier.arcFT130100412
melbourne.elementsid1112899
pubs.edition1
melbourne.contributor.authorBiddulph, Sarah
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidAUST RESEARCH COUNCIL, FT130100412
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidUNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE, FT130100412
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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