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dc.contributor.authorNithianantharajah, J
dc.contributor.authorBalasuriya, GK
dc.contributor.authorFranks, AE
dc.contributor.authorHill-Yardin, EL
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-17T02:57:46Z
dc.date.available2020-12-17T02:57:46Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifierpii: 111
dc.identifier.citationNithianantharajah, J., Balasuriya, G. K., Franks, A. E. & Hill-Yardin, E. L. (2017). Using Animal Models to Study the Role of the Gut-Brain Axis in Autism.. Curr Dev Disord Rep, 4 (2), pp.28-36. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40474-017-0111-4.
dc.identifier.issn2196-2987
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/254691
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE OF REVIEW: Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) commonly also suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction; however, few animal model studies have systematically examined both ASD and GI dysfunction. In this review, we highlight studies investigating GI dysfunction and alterations in gut microbiota in animal models of ASD with the aim of determining if routinely used microbiology and enteric neurophysiology assays could expand our understanding of the link between the two. RECENT FINDINGS: Gut-brain axis research is expanding, and several ASD models demonstrate GI dysfunction. The integration of well-established assays for detecting GI dysfunction into standard behavioural testing batteries is needed. SUMMARY: Advances in understanding the role of the gut-brain axis in ASD are emerging; however, we outline standard assays for investigating gut-brain axis function in rodents to strengthen future phenotyping studies. Integrating these findings to the field of animal behaviour is one of the next major challenges in autism research.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleUsing Animal Models to Study the Role of the Gut-Brain Axis in Autism.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40474-017-0111-4
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPhysiology
melbourne.affiliation.departmentFlorey Department of Neuroscience and Mental Health
melbourne.source.titleCurrent Developmental Disorders Reports
melbourne.source.volume4
melbourne.source.issue2
melbourne.source.pages28-36
melbourne.identifier.arcFT140101327
melbourne.identifier.arcFT160100126
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1221483
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5488132
melbourne.contributor.authorNithianantharajah, Jess
melbourne.contributor.authorHill, Elisa
dc.identifier.eissn2196-2987
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidAustralian Research Council, FT140101327
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidAustralian Research Council, FT160100126
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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