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dc.contributor.authorGao, Q
dc.contributor.authorLiang, W-W
dc.contributor.authorFoltz, SM
dc.contributor.authorMutharasu, G
dc.contributor.authorJayasinghe, RG
dc.contributor.authorCao, S
dc.contributor.authorLiao, W-W
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, SM
dc.contributor.authorWyczalkowski, MA
dc.contributor.authorYao, L
dc.contributor.authorYu, L
dc.contributor.authorSun, SQ
dc.contributor.authorChen, K
dc.contributor.authorLazar, AJ
dc.contributor.authorFields, RC
dc.contributor.authorWendl, MC
dc.contributor.authorVan Tine, BA
dc.contributor.authorVij, R
dc.contributor.authorChen, F
dc.contributor.authorNykter, M
dc.contributor.authorShmulevich, I
dc.contributor.authorDing, L
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-17T03:12:30Z
dc.date.available2020-12-17T03:12:30Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-03
dc.identifierpii: S2211-1247(18)30395-4
dc.identifier.citationGao, Q., Liang, W. -W., Foltz, S. M., Mutharasu, G., Jayasinghe, R. G., Cao, S., Liao, W. -W., Reynolds, S. M., Wyczalkowski, M. A., Yao, L., Yu, L., Sun, S. Q., Chen, K., Lazar, A. J., Fields, R. C., Wendl, M. C., Van Tine, B. A., Vij, R., Chen, F. ,... Ding, L. (2018). Driver Fusions and Their Implications in the Development and Treatment of Human Cancers. CELL REPORTS, 23 (1), pp.227-+. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.050.
dc.identifier.issn2211-1247
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/254789
dc.description.abstractGene fusions represent an important class of somatic alterations in cancer. We systematically investigated fusions in 9,624 tumors across 33 cancer types using multiple fusion calling tools. We identified a total of 25,664 fusions, with a 63% validation rate. Integration of gene expression, copy number, and fusion annotation data revealed that fusions involving oncogenes tend to exhibit increased expression, whereas fusions involving tumor suppressors have the opposite effect. For fusions involving kinases, we found 1,275 with an intact kinase domain, the proportion of which varied significantly across cancer types. Our study suggests that fusions drive the development of 16.5% of cancer cases and function as the sole driver in more than 1% of them. Finally, we identified druggable fusions involving genes such as TMPRSS2, RET, FGFR3, ALK, and ESR1 in 6.0% of cases, and we predicted immunogenic peptides, suggesting that fusions may provide leads for targeted drug and immune therapy.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherCELL PRESS
dc.titleDriver Fusions and Their Implications in the Development and Treatment of Human Cancers
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.050
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSurgery (RMH)
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine and Radiology
melbourne.source.titleCell Reports
melbourne.source.volume23
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages227-+
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1321308
melbourne.contributor.authorBoussioutas, Alex
melbourne.contributor.authorCorcoran, Niall
melbourne.contributor.authorHovens, Christopher
melbourne.contributor.authorCostello, Anthony
dc.identifier.eissn2211-1247
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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