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dc.contributor.authorMorley, BC
dc.contributor.authorNiven, PH
dc.contributor.authorDixon, HG
dc.contributor.authorSwanson, MG
dc.contributor.authorMcAleese, AB
dc.contributor.authorWakefield, MA
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-17T03:27:53Z
dc.date.available2020-12-17T03:27:53Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-01
dc.identifierpii: bmjopen-2017-019574
dc.identifier.citationMorley, B. C., Niven, P. H., Dixon, H. G., Swanson, M. G., McAleese, A. B. & Wakefield, M. A. (2018). Controlled cohort evaluation of the LiveLighter mass media campaign's impact on adults' reported consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. BMJ OPEN, 8 (4), https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019574.
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/254897
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the LiveLighter 'Sugary Drinks' campaign impact on awareness, knowledge and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption. DESIGN: Cohort study with population surveys undertaken in intervention and comparison states at baseline (n=900 each), with 78% retention at follow-up (intervention: n=673; comparison: n=730). Analyses tested interactions by state (intervention, comparison) and time (baseline, follow-up). SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Adults aged 25-49 years residing in the Australian states of Victoria and South Australia. INTERVENTION: The 6-week mass media campaign ran in Victoria in October/November 2015. It focused on the contribution of SSBs to the development of visceral 'toxic fat', graphically depicted around vital organs, and ultimately serious disease. Paid television advertising was complemented by radio, cinema, online and social media advertising, and stakeholder and community engagement. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURE: Self-reported consumption of SSBs, artificially sweetened drinks and water. SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Campaign recall and recognition; knowledge of the health effects of overweight and SSB consumption; perceived impact of SSB consumption on body weight and of reduced consumption on health. RESULTS: A significant reduction in frequent SSB consumption was observed in the intervention state (intervention: 31% compared with 22%, comparison: 30% compared with 29%; interaction p<0.01). This was accompanied by evidence of increased water consumption (intervention: 66% compared with 73%; comparison: 68% compared with 67%; interaction p=0.09) among overweight/obese SSB consumers. This group also showed increased knowledge of the health effects of SSB consumption (intervention: 60% compared with 71%, comparison: 63% compared with 59%; interaction p<0.05) and some evidence of increased prevalence of self-referent thoughts about SSB's relationship to weight gain (intervention: 39% compared with 45%, comparison: 43% compared with 38%; interaction p=0.06). CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide evidence of reduced SSB consumption among adults in the target age range following the LiveLighter campaign. This is notable in a context where public health campaigns occur against a backdrop of heavy commercial product advertising promoting increased SSB consumption.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMJ PUBLISHING GROUP
dc.titleControlled cohort evaluation of the LiveLighter mass media campaign's impact on adults' reported consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019574
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences
melbourne.source.titleBMJ Open
melbourne.source.volume8
melbourne.source.issue4
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC
melbourne.elementsid1325574
melbourne.contributor.authorDixon, Helen
melbourne.contributor.authorWakefield, Melanie
dc.identifier.eissn2044-6055
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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