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dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, B
dc.contributor.authorMalakellis, M
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, J
dc.contributor.authorMillar, L
dc.contributor.authorSwinburn, B
dc.contributor.authorAllender, S
dc.contributor.authorStrugnell, C
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-17T03:44:29Z
dc.date.available2020-12-17T03:44:29Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-09
dc.identifierpii: 10.1186/s12889-016-2913-4
dc.identifier.citationMorrissey, B., Malakellis, M., Whelan, J., Millar, L., Swinburn, B., Allender, S. & Strugnell, C. (2016). Sleep duration and risk of obesity among a sample of Victorian school children.. BMC Public Health, 16 (1), pp.245-. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-2913-4.
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/255011
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Insufficient sleep is potentially an important modifiable risk factor for obesity and poor physical activity and sedentary behaviours among children. However, inconsistencies across studies highlight the need for more objective measures. This paper examines the relationship between sleep duration and objectively measured physical activity, sedentary time and weight status, among a sample of Victorian Primary School children. METHODS: A sub-sample of 298 grades four (n = 157) and six (n = 132) Victorian primary school children (aged 9.2-13.2 years) with complete accelerometry and anthropometry data, from 39 schools, were taken from a pilot study of a larger state based cluster randomized control trial in 2013. Data comprised: researcher measured height and weight; accelerometry derived physical activity and sedentary time; and self-reported sleep duration and hypothesised confounding factors (e.g. age, gender and environmental factors). RESULTS: Compared with sufficient sleepers (67 %), those with insufficient sleep (<10 hrs/day) were significantly more likely to be overweight (OR 1.97, 95 % CI:1.11-3.48) or obese (OR 2.43, 95 % CI:1.26-4.71). No association between sleep and objectively measured physical activity levels or sedentary time was found. CONCLUSION: The strong positive relationship between weight status and sleep deprivation merits further research though PA and sedentary time do not seem to be involved in the relationship. Strategies to improve sleep duration may help obesity prevention initiatives in the future.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleSleep duration and risk of obesity among a sample of Victorian school children.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-016-2913-4
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine, Western Health
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleBMC Public Health
melbourne.source.volume16
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages245-
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1326722
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4784277
melbourne.contributor.authorMillar, Lynne
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2458
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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