Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSugihara, G
dc.contributor.authorKane, F
dc.contributor.authorPicchioni, MM
dc.contributor.authorChaddock, CA
dc.contributor.authorKravariti, E
dc.contributor.authorKalidindi, S
dc.contributor.authorRijsdijk, F
dc.contributor.authorToulopoulou, T
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, VA
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, C
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RM
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, P
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-17T04:13:02Z
dc.date.available2020-12-17T04:13:02Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifierpii: S0924-977X(17)30183-9
dc.identifier.citationSugihara, G., Kane, F., Picchioni, M. M., Chaddock, C. A., Kravariti, E., Kalidindi, S., Rijsdijk, F., Toulopoulou, T., Curtis, V. A., McDonald, C., Murray, R. M. & McGuire, P. (2017). Effects of risk for bipolar disorder on brain function: A twin and family study.. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol, 27 (5), pp.494-503. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.euroneuro.2017.03.001.
dc.identifier.issn0924-977X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/255212
dc.description.abstractBipolar disorder (BPD) is associated with altered regional brain function during the performance of cognitive tasks. The relative contribution of genetic and environmental risk factors for BPD to these changes has not yet been quantified. We sought to address this issue in a functional neuroimaging study of people who varied in their risk for BPD. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to study 124 subjects (29 twin and 9 sibling pairs with at least one member with BPD, and 24 healthy twin pairs) performing a working memory task. We assessed the influence of risk for BPD on regional brain function during the task in a two stage process. Firstly, we identified areas where there were group differences in activation. Secondly, we estimated the heritability and phenotypic correlation of activation and BPD using genetic modeling. BPD was associated with increased activation in the anterior cingulate, orbitofrontal, medial prefrontal, and left precentral cortices, and in the precuneus. Within these regions, activation in the orbitofrontal cortex rendered the most significant heritability estimate (h2=0.40), and was significantly correlated with BPD phenotype (rph=0.29). A moderate proportion of the genetic influences (rg=0.69) acting on both BPD and on the degree of orbitofrontal activation were shared. These findings suggest that genetic factors that confer vulnerability to BPD alter brain function in BPD.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleEffects of risk for bipolar disorder on brain function: A twin and family study.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.euroneuro.2017.03.001
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedical Education
melbourne.source.titleEuropean Neuropsychopharmacology
melbourne.source.volume27
melbourne.source.issue5
melbourne.source.pages494-503
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1334394
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5446324
melbourne.contributor.authorMurray, Robin
dc.identifier.eissn1873-7862
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record