Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorO'Daly, OG
dc.contributor.authorJoyce, D
dc.contributor.authorTracy, DK
dc.contributor.authorAzim, A
dc.contributor.authorStephan, KE
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RM
dc.contributor.authorShergill, SS
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-17T04:26:21Z
dc.date.available2020-12-17T04:26:21Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-13-42725
dc.identifier.citationO'Daly, O. G., Joyce, D., Tracy, D. K., Azim, A., Stephan, K. E., Murray, R. M. & Shergill, S. S. (2014). Amphetamine sensitization alters reward processing in the human striatum and amygdala.. PLoS One, 9 (4), pp.e93955-. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0093955.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/255309
dc.description.abstractDysregulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission is implicated in a number of psychiatric illnesses characterised by disruption of reward processing and goal-directed behaviour, including schizophrenia, drug addiction and impulse control disorders associated with chronic use of dopamine agonists. Amphetamine sensitization (AS) has been proposed to model the development of this aberrant dopamine signalling and the subsequent dysregulation of incentive motivational processes. However, in humans the effects of AS on the dopamine-sensitive neural circuitry associated with reward processing remains unclear. Here we describe the effects of acute amphetamine administration, following a sensitising dosage regime, on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in dopaminoceptive brain regions during a rewarded gambling task performed by healthy volunteers. Using a randomised, double-blind, parallel-groups design, we found clear evidence for sensitization to the subjective effects of the drug, while rewarded reaction times were unchanged. Repeated amphetamine exposure was associated with reduced dorsal striatal BOLD signal during decision making, but enhanced ventromedial caudate activity during reward anticipation. The amygdala BOLD response to reward outcomes was blunted following repeated amphetamine exposure. Positive correlations between subjective sensitization and changes in anticipation- and outcome-related BOLD signal were seen for the caudate nucleus and amygdala, respectively. These data show for the first time in humans that AS changes the functional impact of acute stimulant exposure on the processing of reward-related information within dopaminoceptive regions. Our findings accord with pathophysiological models which implicate aberrant dopaminergic modulation of striatal and amygdala activity in psychosis and drug-related compulsive disorders.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.titleAmphetamine sensitization alters reward processing in the human striatum and amygdala.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0093955
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedical Education
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume9
melbourne.source.issue4
melbourne.source.pagese93955-
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1334530
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3981726
melbourne.contributor.authorMurray, Robin
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record