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dc.contributor.authorNancarrow, SA
dc.contributor.authorRoots, A
dc.contributor.authorGrace, S
dc.contributor.authorMoran, AM
dc.contributor.authorVanniekerk-Lyons, K
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T02:48:35Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T02:48:35Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-11
dc.identifierpii: 1478-4491-11-66
dc.identifier.citationNancarrow, S. A., Roots, A., Grace, S., Moran, A. M. & Vanniekerk-Lyons, K. (2013). Implementing large-scale workforce change: learning from 55 pilot sites of allied health workforce redesign in Queensland, Australia. HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH, 11 (1), https://doi.org/10.1186/1478-4491-11-66.
dc.identifier.issn1478-4491
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/255505
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Increasingly, health workforces are undergoing high-level 're-engineering' to help them better meet the needs of the population, workforce and service delivery. Queensland Health implemented a large scale 5-year workforce redesign program across more than 13 health-care disciplines. This study synthesized the findings from this program to identify and codify mechanisms associated with successful workforce redesign to help inform other large workforce projects. METHODS: This study used Inductive Logic Reasoning (ILR), a process that uses logic models as the primary functional tool to develop theories of change, which are subsequently validated through proposition testing. Initial theories of change were developed from a systematic review of the literature and synthesized using a logic model. These theories of change were then developed into propositions and subsequently tested empirically against documentary, interview, and survey data from 55 projects in the workforce redesign program. RESULTS: Three overarching principles were identified that optimized successful workforce redesign: (1) drivers for change need to be close to practice; (2) contexts need to be supportive both at the local levels and legislatively; and (3) mechanisms should include appropriate engagement, resources to facilitate change management, governance, and support structures. Attendance to these factors was uniformly associated with success of individual projects. CONCLUSIONS: ILR is a transparent and reproducible method for developing and testing theories of workforce change. Despite the heterogeneity of projects, professions, and approaches used, a consistent set of overarching principles underpinned success of workforce change interventions. These concepts have been operationalized into a workforce change checklist.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleImplementing large-scale workforce change: learning from 55 pilot sites of allied health workforce redesign in Queensland, Australia
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1478-4491-11-66
melbourne.affiliation.departmentRural Clinical School
melbourne.source.titleHuman Resources for Health
melbourne.source.volume11
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1285820
melbourne.contributor.authorMoran, Anna
dc.identifier.eissn1478-4491
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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