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dc.contributor.authorMartin, J-R
dc.contributor.authorRogers, KL
dc.contributor.authorChagneau, C
dc.contributor.authorBrulet, P
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T02:50:37Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T02:50:37Z
dc.date.issued2007-03-07
dc.identifier.citationMartin, J. -R., Rogers, K. L., Chagneau, C. & Brulet, P. (2007). In vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Ca2+ Signalling in the Brain of Drosophila. PLOS ONE, 2 (3), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0000275.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/255520
dc.description.abstractMany different cells' signalling pathways are universally regulated by Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)] rises that have highly variable amplitudes and kinetic properties. Optical imaging can provide the means to characterise both the temporal and spatial aspects of Ca(2+) signals involved in neurophysiological functions. New methods for in vivo imaging of Ca(2+) signalling in the brain of Drosophila are required for probing the different dynamic aspects of this system. In studies here, whole brain Ca(2+) imaging was performed on transgenic flies with targeted expression of the bioluminescent Ca(2+) reporter GFP-aequorin (GA) in different neural structures. A photon counting based technique was used to undertake continuous recordings of cytosolic [Ca(2+)] over hours. Time integrals for reconstructing images and analysis of the data were selected offline according to the signal intensity. This approach allowed a unique Ca(2+) response associated with cholinergic transmission to be identified by whole brain imaging of specific neural structures. Notably, [Ca(2+)] transients in the Mushroom Bodies (MBs) following nicotine stimulation were accompanied by a delayed secondary [Ca(2+)] rise (up to 15 min. later) in the MB lobes. The delayed response was sensitive to thapsigargin, suggesting a role for intra-cellular Ca(2+) stores. Moreover, it was reduced in dunce mutant flies, which are impaired in learning and memory. Bioluminescence imaging is therefore useful for studying Ca(2+) signalling pathways and for functional mapping of neurophysiological processes in the fly brain.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleIn vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Ca2+ Signalling in the Brain of Drosophila
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0000275
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedical Biology (W.E.H.I.)
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume2
melbourne.source.issue3
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1190224
melbourne.contributor.authorRogers, Kelly
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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