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dc.contributor.authorMcGregor, S
dc.contributor.authorChurchward, P
dc.contributor.authorSoja, K
dc.contributor.authorO'Driscoll, D
dc.contributor.authorBraybrook, M
dc.contributor.authorKhodakarami, H
dc.contributor.authorEvans, A
dc.contributor.authorFarzanehfar, P
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, G
dc.contributor.authorHorne, M
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T03:05:08Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T03:05:08Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-10
dc.identifierpii: 38
dc.identifier.citationMcGregor, S., Churchward, P., Soja, K., O'Driscoll, D., Braybrook, M., Khodakarami, H., Evans, A., Farzanehfar, P., Hamilton, G. & Horne, M. (2018). The use of accelerometry as a tool to measure disturbed nocturnal sleep in Parkinson's disease. NPJ PARKINSONS DISEASE, 4 (1), https://doi.org/10.1038/s41531-017-0038-9.
dc.identifier.issn2373-8057
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/255623
dc.description.abstractSleep disturbances are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). We used the Parkinson's KinetiGraph (PKG), an objective movement recording system for PD to assess night time sleep in 155 people aged over 60 and without PD (controls), 72 people with PD (PwP) and 46 subjects undergoing a Polysomnogram (PSG: 36 with sleep disorder and 10 with normal sleep). The PKG system uses a wrist worn logger to capture acceleration and derive a bradykinesia score (BKS) every 2 min over 6 days. The BKS ranges from 0-160 with higher scores associated with lesser mobility. Previously we showed that BKS > 80 were associated with day time sleep and used this to produce scores for night time sleep: Efficiency (Percent time with BKS > 80), Fragmentation (Average duration of runs of BKS > 80) and Sleep Quality (BKS > 111 as a representation of atonia). There was a fair association with BKS score and sleep level as judged by PSG. Using these PKG scores, it was possible to distinguish between normal and abnormal PSG studies with good Selectivity (86%) and Sensitivity (80%). The PKG's sleep scores were significantly different in PD and Controls and correlated with a subject's self-assessment (PDSS 2) of the quality, wakefulness and restlessness. Using both the PDSS 2 and the PKG, it was apparent that sleep disturbances were apparent early in disease in many PD subjects and that subjects with poor night time sleep were more likely to have day time sleepiness. This system shows promise as a quantitative score for assessing sleep in Parkinson's disease.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleThe use of accelerometry as a tool to measure disturbed nocturnal sleep in Parkinson's disease
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41531-017-0038-9
melbourne.affiliation.departmentFlorey Department of Neuroscience and Mental Health
melbourne.affiliation.departmentElectrical and Electronic Engineering
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine (RMH)
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyEngineering and Information Technology
melbourne.source.titlenpj Parkinson's Disease
melbourne.source.volume4
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1295841
melbourne.contributor.authorFarzanehfar, Parisa
melbourne.contributor.authorEvans, Andrew
melbourne.contributor.authorHorne, Malcolm
melbourne.contributor.authorKhodakarami, Hamid
dc.identifier.eissn2373-8057
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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