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dc.contributor.authorShen, J
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Y
dc.contributor.authorHopper, JL
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, M
dc.contributor.authorSantella, RM
dc.contributor.authorTerry, MB
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T03:14:48Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T03:14:48Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-01
dc.identifierpii: bjc201781
dc.identifier.citationShen, J., Liao, Y., Hopper, J. L., Goldberg, M., Santella, R. M. & Terry, M. B. (2017). Dependence of cancer risk from environmental exposures on underlying genetic susceptibility: an illustration with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and breast cancer. BRITISH JOURNAL OF CANCER, 116 (9), pp.1229-1233. https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2017.81.
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/255692
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Most studies of environmental risk factors and breast cancer are conducted using average risk cohorts. METHODS: We examined the association between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-albumin adducts in bloods from baseline and breast cancer risk in a prospective nested case-control study (New York site of the BCFR, 80 cases and 156 controls). We estimated the 10-year absolute breast cancer risk by a risk model that uses pedigree information (BOADICEA) and evaluated whether the increased risk from PAH differed by absolute risk. RESULTS: Women with detectable levels of PAH had a twofold association with breast cancer risk (odds ratio (OR)=2.04; 95% CI=1.06-3.93) relative to women with non-detectable levels. The association increased with higher levels of PAH (⩾median) and by a higher level of absolute breast cancer risk (10-year risk ⩾3.4%: OR=4.09, 95% CI=1.38-12.13). CONCLUSIONS: These results support that family-based cohorts can be an efficient way to examine gene-environment interactions.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
dc.titleDependence of cancer risk from environmental exposures on underlying genetic susceptibility: an illustration with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and breast cancer
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/bjc.2017.81
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.source.titleBritish Journal of Cancer
melbourne.source.volume116
melbourne.source.issue9
melbourne.source.pages1229-1233
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC-SA
melbourne.elementsid1197172
melbourne.contributor.authorHopper, John
dc.identifier.eissn1532-1827
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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