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dc.contributor.authorGoranitis, I
dc.contributor.authorBellanca, L
dc.contributor.authorDaley, AJ
dc.contributor.authorThomas, A
dc.contributor.authorStokes-Lampard, H
dc.contributor.authorRoalfe, AK
dc.contributor.authorJowett, S
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T04:05:38Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T04:05:38Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-26
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-16-34050
dc.identifier.citationGoranitis, I., Bellanca, L., Daley, A. J., Thomas, A., Stokes-Lampard, H., Roalfe, A. K. & Jowett, S. (2017). Aerobic exercise for vasomotor menopausal symptoms: A cost-utility analysis based on the Active Women trial. PLOS ONE, 12 (9), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0184328.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/256047
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To compare the cost-utility of two exercise interventions relative to a control group for vasomotor menopausal symptoms. DESIGN: Economic evaluation taking a UK National Health Service and Personal Social Services perspective and a societal perspective. SETTING: Primary care. POPULATION: Peri- and postmenopausal women who have not used hormone therapy in the past 3 months and experience ≥ 5 episodes of vasomotor symptoms daily. METHODS: An individual and a social support-based exercise intervention were evaluated. The former (Exercise-DVD), aimed to prompt exercise with purpose-designed DVD and written materials, whereas the latter (Exercise-Social support) with community exercise social support groups. Costs and outcomes associated with these interventions were compared to those of a control group, who could only have an exercise consultation. An incremental cost-utility analysis was undertaken using bootstrapping to account for the uncertainty around cost-effectiveness point-estimates. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). RESULTS: Data for 261 women were available for analysis. Exercise-DVD was the most expensive and least effective intervention. Exercise-Social support was £52 (CIs: £18 to £86) and £18 (CIs: -£68 to £105) more expensive per woman than the control group at 6 and 12 months post-randomisation and led to 0.006 (CIs: -0.002 to 0.014) and 0.013 (CIs: -0.01 to 0.036) more QALYs, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £8,940 and £1,413 per QALY gained respectively. Exercise-Social support had 80%-90% probability of being cost-effective in the UK context. A societal perspective of analysis and a complete-case analysis led to similar findings. CONCLUSIONS: Exercise-Social support resulted in a small gain in health-related quality of life at a marginal additional cost in a context where broader wellbeing and long-term gains associated with exercise and social participation were not captured. Community exercise social support groups are very likely to be cost-effective in the management of vasomotor menopausal symptoms.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleAerobic exercise for vasomotor menopausal symptoms: A cost-utility analysis based on the Active Women trial
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0184328
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume12
melbourne.source.issue9
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1309702
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5614527
melbourne.contributor.authorGoranitis, Ilias
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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