Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPedersen, M
dc.contributor.authorOmidvarnia, A
dc.contributor.authorCurwood, EK
dc.contributor.authorWalz, JM
dc.contributor.authorRayner, G
dc.contributor.authorJackson, GD
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T04:17:48Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T04:17:48Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-01
dc.identifierpii: S2213-1582(17)30082-7
dc.identifier.citationPedersen, M., Omidvarnia, A., Curwood, E. K., Walz, J. M., Rayner, G. & Jackson, G. D. (2017). The dynamics of functional connectivity in neocortical focal epilepsy. NEUROIMAGE-CLINICAL, 15, pp.209-214. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2017.04.005.
dc.identifier.issn2213-1582
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/256133
dc.description.abstractFocal epilepsy is characterised by paroxysmal events, reflecting changes in underlying local brain networks. To capture brain network activity at the maximal temporal resolution of the acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, we have previously developed a novel analysis framework called Dynamic Regional Phase Synchrony (DRePS). DRePS measures instantaneous mean phase coherence within neighbourhoods of brain voxels. We use it here to examine how the dynamics of the functional connections of regional brain networks are altered in neocortical focal epilepsy. Using task-free fMRI data from 21 subjects with focal epilepsy and 21 healthy controls, we calculated the power spectral density of DRePS, which is a measure of signal variability in local connectivity estimates. Whole-brain averaged power spectral density of DRePS, or signal variability of local connectivity, was significantly higher in epilepsy subjects compared to healthy controls. Maximal increase in DRePS spectral power was seen in bilateral inferior frontal cortices, ipsilateral mid-cingulate gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, caudate head, and contralateral cerebellum. Our results provide further evidence of common brain abnormalities across people with focal epilepsy. We postulate that dynamic changes in specific cortical brain areas may help maintain brain function in the presence of pathological epileptiform network activity in neocortical focal epilepsy.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCI LTD
dc.titleThe dynamics of functional connectivity in neocortical focal epilepsy
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nicl.2017.04.005
melbourne.affiliation.departmentFlorey Department of Neuroscience and Mental Health
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of Physics
melbourne.source.titleNeuroImage: Clinical
melbourne.source.volume15
melbourne.source.pages209-214
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc1091593
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC-ND
melbourne.elementsid1213399
melbourne.contributor.authorCurwood, Evan
melbourne.contributor.authorJackson, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorRayner, Genevieve
melbourne.contributor.authorPedersen, Mangor
melbourne.contributor.authorOmidvarnia, Amir
dc.identifier.eissn2213-1582
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 1091593
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record