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dc.contributor.authorReniers, RLEP
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, L
dc.contributor.authorLin, A
dc.contributor.authorBartolome, SP
dc.contributor.authorWood, SJ
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T04:29:13Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T04:29:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-21
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-15-32394
dc.identifier.citationReniers, R. L. E. P., Murphy, L., Lin, A., Bartolome, S. P. & Wood, S. J. (2016). Risk Perception and Risk-Taking Behaviour during Adolescence: The Influence of Personality and Gender. PLOS ONE, 11 (4), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0153842.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/256214
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the influence of personality characteristics and gender on adolescents' perception of risk and their risk-taking behaviour. Male and female participants (157 females: 116 males, aged 13-20) completed self-report measures on risk perception, risk-taking and personality. Male participants perceived behaviours as less risky, reportedly took more risks, were less sensitive to negative outcomes and less socially anxious than female participants. Path analysis identified a model in which age, behavioural inhibition and impulsiveness directly influenced risk perception, while age, social anxiety, impulsiveness, sensitivity to reward, behavioural inhibition and risk perception itself were directly or indirectly associated with risk-taking behaviour. Age and behavioural inhibition had direct relationships with social anxiety, and reward sensitivity was associated with impulsiveness. The model was representative for the whole sample and male and female groups separately. The observed relationship between age and social anxiety and the influence this may have on risk-taking behaviour could be key for reducing adolescent risk-taking behaviour. Even though adolescents may understand the riskiness of their behaviour and estimate their vulnerability to risk at a similar level to adults, factors such as anxiety regarding social situations, sensitivity to reward and impulsiveness may exert their influence and make these individuals prone to taking risks. If these associations are proven causal, these factors are, and will continue to be, important targets in prevention and intervention efforts.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.titleRisk Perception and Risk-Taking Behaviour during Adolescence: The Influence of Personality and Gender
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0153842
melbourne.affiliation.departmentCentre for Youth Mental Health
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume11
melbourne.source.issue4
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1215387
melbourne.contributor.authorWood, Stephen
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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