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dc.contributor.authorSteinemann, A
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T04:38:58Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T04:38:58Z
dc.date.issued2018-06
dc.identifierpii: S2211-3355(18)30045-7
dc.identifier.citationSteinemann, A. (2018). Prevalence and effects of multiple chemical sensitivities in Australia.. Prev Med Rep, 10, pp.191-194. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.03.007.
dc.identifier.issn2211-3355
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/256291
dc.description.abstractMultiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) is a medical condition associated with exposure to common chemical pollutants. The aims of this study are to assess the prevalence of MCS, its overlaps with asthma and fragrance sensitivity, and its health and societal effects in Australia. Data were collected in June 2016 using an on-line survey with a representative national sample (N = 1098) of adults (ages 18-65) in Australia. Results found that, across the country, 6.5% report medically diagnosed MCS, 18.9% report chemical sensitivity (being unusually sensitive to everyday chemicals and chemically formulated products), and 19.9% either or both. Among people with MCS, 74.6% also have diagnosed asthma or an asthma-like condition, and 91.5% have fragrance sensitivity, reporting health problems (such as migraine headaches) when exposed to fragranced consumer products (such as air fresheners and cleaning supplies). In addition, among people with MCS, 77.5% are prevented from access to places because of fragranced products, 52.1% lost workdays or a job in the past year due to fragranced product exposure in the workplace, and 55.4% report health effects considered potentially disabling. Results indicate that MCS is a widespread disease, affecting an estimated 1 million adult Australians, with chemical sensitivity affecting another 2 million. Reducing chemical exposure to problematic sources, such as fragranced consumer products, is critical to reduce adverse effects.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.titlePrevalence and effects of multiple chemical sensitivities in Australia.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.03.007
melbourne.affiliation.departmentInfrastructure Engineering
melbourne.source.titlePreventive Medicine Reports
melbourne.source.volume10
melbourne.source.pages191-194
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1320402
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5984225
melbourne.contributor.authorSteinemann, Anne
dc.identifier.eissn2211-3355
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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