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dc.contributor.authorHardefeldt, LY
dc.contributor.authorGilkerson, JR
dc.contributor.authorBillman-Jacobe, H
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, MA
dc.contributor.authorThursky, K
dc.contributor.authorBailey, KE
dc.contributor.authorBrowning, GF
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T04:40:46Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T04:40:46Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-01
dc.identifier.citationHardefeldt, L. Y., Gilkerson, J. R., Billman-Jacobe, H., Stevenson, M. A., Thursky, K., Bailey, K. E. & Browning, G. F. (2018). Barriers to and enablers of implementing antimicrobial stewardship programs in veterinary practices. JOURNAL OF VETERINARY INTERNAL MEDICINE, 32 (3), pp.1092-1099. https://doi.org/10.1111/jvim.15083.
dc.identifier.issn0891-6640
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/256307
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs are yet to be widely implemented in veterinary practice and medical programs are unlikely to be directly applicable to veterinary settings. OBJECTIVE: To gain an in-depth understanding of the factors that influence effective AMS in veterinary practices in Australia. METHODS: A concurrent explanatory mixed methods design was used. The quantitative phase of the study consisted of an online questionnaire to assess veterinarians' attitudes to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and antimicrobial use in animals, and the extent to which AMS currently is implemented (knowingly or unknowingly). The qualitative phase used semi-structured interviews to gain an understanding of the barriers to and enablers of AMS in veterinary practices. Data were collected and entered into NVivo v.11, openly coded and analyzed according to mixed methods data analysis principles. RESULTS: Companion animal, equine, and bovine veterinarians participated in the study. Veterinary practices rarely had antimicrobial prescribing policies. The key barriers were a lack of AMS governance structures, client expectations and competition between practices, cost of microbiological testing, and lack of access to education, training and AMS resources. The enablers were concern for the role of veterinary antimicrobial use in development of AMR in humans, a sense of pride in the service provided, and preparedness to change prescribing practices. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Our study can guide development and establishment of AMS programs in veterinary practices by defining the major issues that influence the prescribing behavior of veterinarians.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
dc.titleBarriers to and enablers of implementing antimicrobial stewardship programs in veterinary practices
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jvim.15083
melbourne.affiliation.departmentVeterinary Biosciences
melbourne.affiliation.departmentInfectious Diseases
melbourne.affiliation.facultyVeterinary and Agricultural Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
melbourne.source.volume32
melbourne.source.issue3
melbourne.source.pages1092-1099
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc1079625
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC
melbourne.elementsid1318667
melbourne.contributor.authorHardefeldt, Laura
melbourne.contributor.authorBillman-Jacobe, Helen
melbourne.contributor.authorGilkerson, James
melbourne.contributor.authorBrowning, Glenn
melbourne.contributor.authorBailey, Kirsten
melbourne.contributor.authorThursky, Karin
melbourne.contributor.authorStevenson, Mark
dc.identifier.eissn1939-1676
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 1079625
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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