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dc.contributor.authorMiura, K
dc.contributor.authorTurrell, G
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T01:04:18Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T01:04:18Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-30
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-14-11493
dc.identifier.citationMiura, K. & Turrell, G. (2014). Contribution of Psychosocial Factors to the Association between Socioeconomic Position and Takeaway Food Consumption. PLOS ONE, 9 (9), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0108799.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/256354
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To examine whether psychosocial factors mediate (explain) the association between socioeconomic position and takeaway food consumption. DESIGN: A cross-sectional postal survey conducted in 2009. SETTING: Participants reported their usual consumption of 22 takeaway food items, and these were grouped into a "healthy" and "less healthy" index based on each items' nutritional properties. Principal Components Analysis was used to derive three psychosocial scales that measured beliefs about the relationship between diet and health (α = 0.73), and perceptions about the value (α = 0.79) and pleasure (α = 0.61) of takeaway food. A nutrition knowledge index was also used. Socioeconomic position was measured by highest attained education level. SUBJECTS: Randomly selected adults (n = 1,500) aged between 25-64 years in Brisbane, Australia (response rate  =  63.7%, N = 903). RESULTS: Compared with those with a bachelor degree or higher, participants with a diploma level of education were more likely to consume "healthy" takeaway food (p = 0.023) whereas the least educated (high school only) were more likely to consume "less healthy" choices (p = 0.002). The least educated were less likely to believe in a relationship between diet and health (p<0.001), and more likely to have lower nutritional knowledge compared with their highly educated counterparts (p<0.001). Education differences in beliefs about the relationship between diet and health partly and significantly mediated the association between education and "healthy" takeaway food consumption. Diet- and health-related beliefs and nutritional knowledge partly and significantly mediated the education differences in "less healthy" takeaway food consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions that target beliefs about the relationship between diet and health, and nutritional knowledge may reduce socioeconomic differences in takeaway food consumption, particularly for "less healthy" options.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleContribution of Psychosocial Factors to the Association between Socioeconomic Position and Takeaway Food Consumption
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0108799
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume9
melbourne.source.issue9
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1218265
melbourne.contributor.authorTurrell, Gavin
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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