Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWu, TY
dc.contributor.authorPutaala, J
dc.contributor.authorSharma, G
dc.contributor.authorStrbian, D
dc.contributor.authorTatlisumak, T
dc.contributor.authorDavis, SM
dc.contributor.authorMeretoja, A
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T01:37:35Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T01:37:35Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-01
dc.identifierpii: JAHA.117.005760
dc.identifier.citationWu, T. Y., Putaala, J., Sharma, G., Strbian, D., Tatlisumak, T., Davis, S. M. & Meretoja, A. (2017). Persistent Hyperglycemia Is Associated With Increased Mortality After Intracerebral Hemorrhage. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, 6 (8), https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.117.005760.
dc.identifier.issn2047-9980
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/256589
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Hyperglycemia may be associated with worse outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We assessed the association of early glycemic trajectory on ICH mortality and edema growth. METHODS AND RESULTS: We included patients from the Helsinki ICH study with glucose measurements at least once between both 0 to 24 and 24 to 72 hours from onset. Hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose ≥8 mmol/L (144 mg/dL) based on the local threshold for treatment. Glycemic trajectory was defined on maximum values 0 to 24 and 24 to 72 hours after ICH: (1) persistent normoglycemia in both epochs; (2) late hyperglycemia (only between 24 and 72 hours); (3) early hyperglycemia (only before 24 hours); and (4) persistent hyperglycemia in both epochs. Logistic regression with known predictors of outcome estimated the association of glycemic trajectory and 6-month mortality. A generalized linear model assessed the association of glycemic trajectory and interpolated 72-hour edema extension distance. A total of 576 patients met eligibility criteria, of whom 214 (37.2%) had persistent normoglycemia, 44 (7.6%) late hyperglycemia, 151 (26.2%) early hyperglycemia, and 167 (29.0%) persistent hyperglycemia. Six-month mortality was higher in the persistent (51.1%) and early (26.3%) hyperglycemia groups than the normoglycemia (19.0%) and late hyperglycemia (3.6%) groups. Persistent hyperglycemia was associated with 6-month mortality (odds ratio 3.675, 95% CI 1.989-6.792; P<0.001). Both univariate (P=0.426) and multivariable (P=0.493) generalized linear model analyses showed no association between glycemic trajectory and 72-hour edema extension distance. CONCLUSION: Early hyperglycemia after ICH is harmful if it is persistent. Strategies to achieve glycemic control after ICH may influence patient outcome and need to be assessed in clinical trials.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titlePersistent Hyperglycemia Is Associated With Increased Mortality After Intracerebral Hemorrhage
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/JAHA.117.005760
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine (RMH)
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleJournal of the American Heart Association
melbourne.source.volume6
melbourne.source.issue8
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1225436
melbourne.contributor.authorDavis, Stephen
melbourne.contributor.authorSharma, Gagan
melbourne.contributor.authorMeretoja, Atte
melbourne.contributor.authorWu, Teddy
dc.identifier.eissn2047-9980
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record