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dc.contributor.authorJolly, TAD
dc.contributor.authorBateman, GA
dc.contributor.authorLevi, CR
dc.contributor.authorParsons, MW
dc.contributor.authorMichie, PT
dc.contributor.authorKarayanidis, F
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T01:39:38Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T01:39:38Z
dc.date.issued2013-11-18
dc.identifier.citationJolly, T. A. D., Bateman, G. A., Levi, C. R., Parsons, M. W., Michie, P. T. & Karayanidis, F. (2013). Early detection of microstructural white matter changes associated with arterial pulsatility. FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, 7 (NOV), https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00782.
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/256604
dc.description.abstractIncreased cerebral blood flow pulsatility is common in vascular dementia and is associated with macrostructural damage to cerebral white matter or leukoaraiosis (LA). In this study, we examine whether cerebral blood flow pulsatility is associated with macrostructural and microstructural changes in cerebral white matter in older adults with no or mild LA and no evidence of dementia. Diffusion Tensor Imaging was used to measure fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of the microstructural integrity of white matter, and radial diffusivity (RaD), a measure sensitive to the integrity of myelin. When controlling for age, increased arterial pulsation was associated with deterioration in both measures of white matter microstructure but not LA severity. A stepwise multiple linear regression model revealed that arterial pulsatility index was the strongest predictor of FA (R = 0.483, adjusted R (2) = 0.220), followed by LA severity, but not age. These findings suggest that arterial pulsatility may provide insight into age-related reduction in white matter FA. Specifically, increased arterial pulsatility may increase perivascular shear stress and lead to accumulation of damage to perivascular oligodendrocytes, resulting in microstructural changes in white matter and contributing to proliferation of LA over time. Changes in cerebral blood flow pulsatility may therefore provide a sensitive index of white matter health that could facilitate the early detection of risk for perivascular white matter damage and the assessment of the effectiveness of preventative treatment targeted at reducing pulsatility.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SA
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleEarly detection of microstructural white matter changes associated with arterial pulsatility
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2013.00782
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine (RMH)
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
melbourne.source.volume7
melbourne.source.issueNOV
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1225825
melbourne.contributor.authorParsons, Mark
dc.identifier.eissn1662-5161
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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