Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKamel, JT
dc.contributor.authorBadawy, RAB
dc.contributor.authorCook, MJ
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T01:56:04Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T01:56:04Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifierpii: S2213-3232(13)00050-9
dc.identifier.citationKamel, J. T., Badawy, R. A. B. & Cook, M. J. (2014). Exercise-induced seizures and lateral asymmetry in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.. Epilepsy Behav Case Rep, 2 (1), pp.26-30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebcr.2013.12.004.
dc.identifier.issn2213-3232
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/256719
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The objective of this case report is to better characterize the clinical features and potential pathophysiological mechanisms of exercise-induced seizures. METHODS: We report a case series of ten patients from a tertiary epilepsy center, where a clear history was obtained of physical exercise as a reproducible trigger for seizures. RESULTS: The precipitating type of exercise was quite specific for each patient, and various forms of exercise are described including running, swimming, playing netball, dancing, cycling, weight lifting, and martial arts. The level of physical exertion also correlated with the likelihood of seizure occurrence. All ten patients had temporal lobe abnormalities, with nine of the ten patients having isolated temporal lobe epilepsies, as supported by seizure semiology, EEG recordings, and both structural and functional imaging. Nine of the ten patients had seizures that were lateralized to the left (dominant) hemisphere. Five patients underwent surgical resection, with no successful long-term postoperative outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Exercise may be an underrecognized form of reflex epilepsy, which tended to be refractory to both medical and surgical interventions in our patients. Almost all patients in our cohort had seizures localizing to the left temporal lobe. We discuss potential mechanisms by which exercise may precipitate seizures, and its relevance regarding our understanding of temporal lobe epilepsy and lateralization of seizures. Recognition of, as well as advice regarding avoidance of, known triggers forms an important part of management of these patients.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleExercise-induced seizures and lateral asymmetry in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ebcr.2013.12.004
melbourne.affiliation.departmentEngineering and Information Technology
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine (St Vincent's)
melbourne.affiliation.facultyEngineering and Information Technology
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleEpilepsy and Behavior Case Reports
melbourne.source.volume2
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages26-30
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1106906
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4308088
melbourne.contributor.authorCook, Mark
melbourne.contributor.authorBadawy, Radwa Aly Bakry
melbourne.contributor.authorKamel, Jordan
dc.identifier.eissn2213-3232
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record