Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTurner, KM
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, JB
dc.contributor.authorMeikle, PJ
dc.contributor.authorClifton, PM
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T02:04:58Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T02:04:58Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-01
dc.identifierpii: nu9080886
dc.identifier.citationTurner, K. M., Keogh, J. B., Meikle, P. J. & Clifton, P. M. (2017). Changes in Lipids and Inflammatory Markers after Consuming Diets High in Red Meat or Dairy for Four Weeks. NUTRIENTS, 9 (8), https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9080886.
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/256777
dc.description.abstractThere is a body of evidence linking inflammation, altered lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Our previous research found that insulin sensitivity decreased after a four-week diet high in dairy compared to a control diet and to one high in red meat. Our aim was to determine whether a relationship exists between changes in insulin sensitivity and inflammatory biomarkers, or with lipid species. Fasting Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α), Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor II (sTNF-RII), C-reactive protein (CRP), and lipids were measured at the end of each diet. TNF-α and the ratio TNF-α/sTNF-RII were not different between diets and TNF-α, sTNF-RII, or the ratio TNF-α/sTNF-RII showed no association with homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). A number of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) species differed between dairy and red meat and dairy and control diets, as did many phosphatidylcholine (PC) species and cholesteryl ester (CE) 14:0, CE15:0, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) 14:0, and LPC15:0. None had a significant relationship (p = 0.001 or better) with log homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), although LPC14:0 had the strongest relationship (p = 0.004) and may be the main mediator of the effect of dairy on insulin sensitivity. LPC14:0 and the whole LPC class were correlated with CRP. The correlations between dietary change and the minor plasma phospholipids PI32:1 and PE32:1 are novel and may reflect significant changes in membrane composition. Inflammatory markers were not altered by changes in protein source while the correlation of LPC with CRP confirms a relationship between changes in lipid profile and inflammation.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.titleChanges in Lipids and Inflammatory Markers after Consuming Diets High in Red Meat or Dairy for Four Weeks
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu9080886
melbourne.affiliation.departmentBio21
melbourne.source.titleNutrients
melbourne.source.volume9
melbourne.source.issue8
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1231317
melbourne.contributor.authorMeikle, Peter
dc.identifier.eissn2072-6643
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record