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dc.contributor.authorJackson, TNW
dc.contributor.authorKoludarov, I
dc.contributor.authorAli, SA
dc.contributor.authorDobson, J
dc.contributor.authorZdenek, CN
dc.contributor.authorDashevsky, D
dc.contributor.authorop den Brouw, B
dc.contributor.authorMasci, PP
dc.contributor.authorNouwens, A
dc.contributor.authorJosh, P
dc.contributor.authorGoldenberg, J
dc.contributor.authorCipriani, V
dc.contributor.authorHay, C
dc.contributor.authorHendrikx, I
dc.contributor.authorDunstan, N
dc.contributor.authorAllen, L
dc.contributor.authorFry, BG
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T03:04:14Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T03:04:14Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-01
dc.identifierpii: toxins8110309
dc.identifier.citationJackson, T. N. W., Koludarov, I., Ali, S. A., Dobson, J., Zdenek, C. N., Dashevsky, D., op den Brouw, B., Masci, P. P., Nouwens, A., Josh, P., Goldenberg, J., Cipriani, V., Hay, C., Hendrikx, I., Dunstan, N., Allen, L. & Fry, B. G. (2016). Rapid Radiations and the Race to Redundancy: An Investigation of the Evolution of Australian Elapid Snake Venoms. TOXINS, 8 (11), https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins8110309.
dc.identifier.issn2072-6651
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/257059
dc.description.abstractAustralia is the stronghold of the front-fanged venomous snake family Elapidae. The Australasian elapid snake radiation, which includes approximately 100 terrestrial species in Australia, as well as Melanesian species and all the world's sea snakes, is less than 12 million years old. The incredible phenotypic and ecological diversity of the clade is matched by considerable diversity in venom composition. The clade's evolutionary youth and dynamic evolution should make it of particular interest to toxinologists, however, the majority of species, which are small, typically inoffensive, and seldom encountered by non-herpetologists, have been almost completely neglected by researchers. The present study investigates the venom composition of 28 species proteomically, revealing several interesting trends in venom composition, and reports, for the first time in elapid snakes, the existence of an ontogenetic shift in the venom composition and activity of brown snakes (Pseudonaja sp.). Trends in venom composition are compared to the snakes' feeding ecology and the paper concludes with an extended discussion of the selection pressures shaping the evolution of snake venom.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleRapid Radiations and the Race to Redundancy: An Investigation of the Evolution of Australian Elapid Snake Venoms
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/toxins8110309
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPharmacology and Therapeutics
melbourne.source.titleToxins
melbourne.source.volume8
melbourne.source.issue11
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1113838
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5127106
melbourne.contributor.authorJackson, Timothy
dc.identifier.eissn2072-6651
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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