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dc.contributor.authorBiezen, R
dc.contributor.authorBrijnath, B
dc.contributor.authorGrando, D
dc.contributor.authorMazza, D
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T03:28:46Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T03:28:46Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-07
dc.identifierpii: 10.1038/s41533-017-0018-x
dc.identifier.citationBiezen, R., Brijnath, B., Grando, D. & Mazza, D. (2017). Management of respiratory tract infections in young children-A qualitative study of primary care providers' perspectives.. NPJ Prim Care Respir Med, 27 (1), pp.15-. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41533-017-0018-x.
dc.identifier.issn2055-1010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/257222
dc.description.abstractRespiratory tract infections in young children are the most common cause of general practice visits in Australia. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines, the treatment and management of respiratory tract infections in young children is inconsistent. The aim of the study was to explore the management of respiratory tract infections in young children from a multi-disciplinary perspective using across-sectional qualitative research design based on the theoretical domains framework and the Capability, Opportunity and Motivation-B model. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 primary care providers to explore their knowledge, views and management of respiratory tract infections in young children. Interviews focused on symptomatic management, over-the-counter medications and antibiotic use, and data were thematically analysed. Our findings showed that factors such as primary care providers' time constraints, parental anxiety, general practitioners' perception of what parents want, perceived parental pressure, and fear of losing patients were some of the reasons why primary care providers did not always adhere to guideline recommendations. Primary care providers also provided conflicting advice to parents concerning over-the-counter medications and when children should resume normal activities. Overall, this study showed that complex interactions involving emotional and psychological factors influenced the decision making process of primary care providers' management of respiratory tract infections in young children. A team care approach with consistent advice, and improved communication between primary care providers and parents is vital to overcome some of these barriers and improve guideline adherence. The findings of this research will inform the development of interventions to better manage respiratory tract infections in young children. RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS: CLINICIANS SWAYED BY PARENTAL ANXIETY AND PRESSURE: The emotions and psychology of both parents and clinicians influence how respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are managed in young children. Researchers in Australia, led by Ruby Biezen from Monash University, interviewed 30 primary care clinicians about their views on how to care for children with RTIs, such as the common cold. The interviews focused on symptomatic management, over-the-counter medications and antibiotic use. Despite the availability of best-practice guidelines, clinicians did not always follow the recommendations owing to factors such as time constraints, parental anxiety, perceived parental pressure, and fear of losing patients. These are some of the reasons why clinicians sometimes advise or prescribe unnecessary medications. The authors suggest that a team approach involving multiple healthcare professionals who deliver consistent advice could improve guideline adherence.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleManagement of respiratory tract infections in young children-A qualitative study of primary care providers' perspectives.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41533-017-0018-x
melbourne.affiliation.departmentGeneral Practice
melbourne.source.titlenpj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine
melbourne.source.volume27
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages15-
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1255528
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5434780
melbourne.contributor.authorBiezen, Ruby
dc.identifier.eissn2055-1010
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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