Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTsai, A
dc.contributor.authorHughes, EK
dc.contributor.authorFuller-Tyszkiewicz, M
dc.contributor.authorBuck, K
dc.contributor.authorKrug, I
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T03:28:54Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T03:28:54Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-27
dc.identifier.citationTsai, A., Hughes, E. K., Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M., Buck, K. & Krug, I. (2017). The Differential Effects of Mindfulness and Distraction on Affect and Body Satisfaction Following Food Consumption. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 8 (SEP), https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01696.
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/257223
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated whether engaging in mindfulness following food consumption produced changes in affect and body satisfaction, as compared to a control distraction task. The moderating effects of eating pathology and neuroticism were also examined. A total of 110 female university students consumed food and water before engaging in either a mindfulness induction or a control distraction task. Participants completed trait measures of eating pathology and neuroticism at baseline, and measures of state affect and body satisfaction before and after food consumption, and after the induction. Results revealed that consuming food and water reduced positive affect. Unexpectedly, both the mindfulness group and distraction control group experienced similar improvements in negative affect and body satisfaction following the induction. Eating pathology and neuroticism did not moderate the observed changes. These findings suggest that both mindfulness and distraction may contribute to the effectiveness of treatments for disordered eating that incorporate both of these techniques, such as Dialectical Behavior Therapy.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SA
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleThe Differential Effects of Mindfulness and Distraction on Affect and Body Satisfaction Following Food Consumption
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01696
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.department
melbourne.source.titleFrontiers in Psychology
melbourne.source.volume8
melbourne.source.issueSEP
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1255825
melbourne.contributor.authorHughes, Elizabeth
melbourne.contributor.authorBuck, Kimberly
melbourne.contributor.authorKrug, Isabel
melbourne.contributor.authorTSAI, ALICE
dc.identifier.eissn1664-1078
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record