Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorShoemark, H
dc.contributor.authorHanson-Abromeit, D
dc.contributor.authorStewart, L
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T03:44:21Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T03:44:21Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-03
dc.identifier.citationShoemark, H., Hanson-Abromeit, D. & Stewart, L. (2015). Constructing optimal experience for the hospitalized newborn through neuro-based music therapy. FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, 9 (september), https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2015.00487.
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/257332
dc.description.abstractMusic-based intervention for hospitalized newborn infants has traditionally been based in a biomedical model, with physiological stability as the prime objective. More recent applications are grounded in other theories, including attachment, trauma and neurological models in which infant, parent and the dyadic interaction may be viewed as a dynamic system bound by the common context of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The immature state of the preterm infant's auditory processing system requires a careful and individualized approach for the introduction of purposeful auditory experience intended to support development. The infant's experience of an unpredictable auditory environment is further compromised by a potential lack of meaningful auditory stimulation. Parents often feel disconnected from their own capacities to nurture their infant with potentially life-long implications for the infant's neurobehavioral and psychological well-being. This perspectives paper will outline some neurological considerations for auditory processing in the premature infant to frame a premise for music-based interventions. A hypothetical clinical case will illustrate the application of music by a music therapist with an infant and family in NICU.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SA
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleConstructing optimal experience for the hospitalized newborn through neuro-based music therapy
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2015.00487
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Conservatorium of Music
melbourne.source.titleFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
melbourne.source.volume9
melbourne.source.issueseptember
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1266481
melbourne.contributor.authorShoemark, Helen
dc.identifier.eissn1662-5161
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record