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dc.contributor.authorDavid, MA
dc.contributor.authorTayebi, M
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T03:51:15Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T03:51:15Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-01
dc.identifier.citationDavid, M. A. & Tayebi, M. (2014). Detection of protein aggregates in brain and cerebrospinal fluid derived from multiple sclerosis patients. FRONTIERS IN NEUROLOGY, 5, https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2014.00251.
dc.identifier.issn1664-2295
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/257381
dc.description.abstractStudies of the properties of soluble oligomer species of amyloidogenic proteins, derived from different proteins with little sequence homology, have indicated that they share a common structure and may share similar pathogenic mechanisms. Amyloid β, tau protein, as well as amyloid precursor protein normally associated with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease were found in lesions and plaques of multiple sclerosis patients. The objective of the study is to investigate whether brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples derived from multiple sclerosis patients demonstrate the presence of soluble oligomers normally associated with protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. We have used anti-oligomer monoclonal antibodies to immunodetect soluble oligomers in CSF and brain tissues derived from multiple sclerosis patients. In this report, we describe the presence of soluble oligomers in the brain tissue and cerebral spinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients detected with our monoclonal anti-oligomer antibodies with Western blot and Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (sELISA). These results might suggest that protein aggregation plays a role in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis although further and more refined studies are needed to confirm the role of soluble aggregates in multiple sclerosis.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SA
dc.titleDetection of protein aggregates in brain and cerebrospinal fluid derived from multiple sclerosis patients
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fneur.2014.00251
melbourne.affiliation.departmentFlorey Department of Neuroscience and Mental Health
melbourne.source.titleFrontiers in Neurology
melbourne.source.volume5
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1174666
melbourne.contributor.authorTayebi, Mourad
dc.identifier.eissn1664-2295
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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