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dc.contributor.authorLombi, E
dc.contributor.authorde Jonge, MD
dc.contributor.authorDonner, E
dc.contributor.authorKopittke, PM
dc.contributor.authorHoward, DL
dc.contributor.authorKirkham, R
dc.contributor.authorRyan, CG
dc.contributor.authorPaterson, D
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T04:02:23Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T04:02:23Z
dc.date.issued2011-06-02
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-11-05970
dc.identifier.citationLombi, E., de Jonge, M. D., Donner, E., Kopittke, P. M., Howard, D. L., Kirkham, R., Ryan, C. G. & Paterson, D. (2011). Fast X-Ray Fluorescence Microtomography of Hydrated Biological Samples. PLOS ONE, 6 (6), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0020626.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/257458
dc.description.abstractMetals and metalloids play a key role in plant and other biological systems as some of them are essential to living organisms and all can be toxic at high concentrations. It is therefore important to understand how they are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. In situ imaging of metal distribution at physiological relevant concentrations in highly hydrated biological systems is technically challenging. In the case of roots, this is mainly due to the possibility of artifacts arising during sample preparation such as cross sectioning. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography has been used to obtain virtual cross sections of elemental distributions. However, traditionally this technique requires long data acquisition times. This has prohibited its application to highly hydrated biological samples which suffer both radiation damage and dehydration during extended analysis. However, recent advances in fast detectors coupled with powerful data acquisition approaches and suitable sample preparation methods can circumvent this problem. We demonstrate the heightened potential of this technique by imaging the distribution of nickel and zinc in hydrated plant roots. Although 3D tomography was still impeded by radiation damage, we successfully collected 2D tomograms of hydrated plant roots exposed to environmentally relevant metal concentrations for short periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first published example of the possibilities offered by a new generation of fast fluorescence detectors to investigate metal and metalloid distribution in radiation-sensitive, biological samples.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.titleFast X-Ray Fluorescence Microtomography of Hydrated Biological Samples
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0020626
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of Physics
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume6
melbourne.source.issue6
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1272776
melbourne.contributor.authorRyan, Christopher
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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