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dc.contributor.authorThomas, NA
dc.contributor.authorChurches, O
dc.contributor.authorWhite, I
dc.contributor.authorMohr, C
dc.contributor.authorSchrag, Y
dc.contributor.authorObucina, S
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, MER
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T04:03:16Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T04:03:16Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-11
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-17-05419
dc.identifier.citationThomas, N. A., Churches, O., White, I., Mohr, C., Schrag, Y., Obucina, S. & Nicholls, M. E. R. (2017). An investigation of left/right driving rules on deviations while walking. PLOS ONE, 12 (10), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0186171.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/257464
dc.description.abstractWhen traversing through an aperture, such as a doorway, people characteristically deviate towards the right. This rightward deviation can be explained by a rightward attentional bias which leads to rightward bisections in far space. It is also possible, however, that left or right driving practices affect the deviation. To explore this possibility, Australian (left-side drivers) and Swiss (right-side drivers) participants (n = 36 & 34) walked through the middle of an aperture. To control for the sway of the body, participants started with either their left or right foot. Sway had a significant effect on participants' position in the doorway and the amount of sway was greater for Australians-perhaps due to national differences in gait. There was a significant rightward deviation for the Swiss, but not for the Australians. It is suggested that driving practices have a small additive effect on rightward attentional biases whereby the bias is increased for people who drive on the right and reduced in people who drive on the left.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.titleAn investigation of left/right driving rules on deviations while walking
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0186171
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume12
melbourne.source.issue10
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1274712
melbourne.contributor.authorNicholls, Michael
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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