Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVan Cauwenberg, J
dc.contributor.authorVan Holle, V
dc.contributor.authorDe Bourdeaudhuij, I
dc.contributor.authorOwen, N
dc.contributor.authorDeforche, B
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-22T02:47:49Z
dc.date.available2020-12-22T02:47:49Z
dc.date.issued2015-08-05
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-15-06376
dc.identifier.citationVan Cauwenberg, J., Van Holle, V., De Bourdeaudhuij, I., Owen, N. & Deforche, B. (2015). Diurnal Patterns and Correlates of Older Adults' Sedentary Behavior. PLOS ONE, 10 (8), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0133175.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/257714
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Insights into the diurnal patterns of sedentary behavior and the identification of subgroups that are at increased risk for engaging in high levels of sedentary behavior are needed to inform potential interventions for reducing older adults' sedentary time. Therefore, we examined the diurnal patterns and sociodemographic correlates of older adults' sedentary behavior(s). METHODS: Stratified cluster sampling was used to recruit 508 non-institutionalized Belgian older adults (≥ 65 years). Morning, afternoon, evening and total sedentary time was assessed objectively using accelerometers. Specific sedentary behaviors, total sitting time and sociodemographic attributes were assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. RESULTS: Participants self-reported a median of 475 (Q1-Q3 = 383-599) minutes/day of total sitting time and they accumulated a mean of 580 ± 98 minutes/day of accelerometer-derived sedentary time. Sedentary time was lowest during the morning and highest during the evening. Older participants were as sedentary as younger participants during the evening, but they were more sedentary during daytime. Compared to married participants, widowers were more sedentary during daytime. Younger participants (< 75 years), men and the higher educated were more likely to engage in (high levels of) sitting while driving a car and using the computer. Those with tertiary education viewed 29% and 22% minutes/day less television compared to those with primary or secondary education, respectively. Older participants accumulated 35 sedentary minutes/day more than did younger participants and men accumulated 32 sedentary minutes/day more than did women. CONCLUSION: These findings highlight diurnal variations and potential opportunities to tailor approaches to reducing sedentary time for subgroups of the older adult population.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleDiurnal Patterns and Correlates of Older Adults' Sedentary Behavior
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0133175
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume10
melbourne.source.issue8
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc569940
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc1003960
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1003920
melbourne.contributor.authorOWEN, NEVILLE
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 569940
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 1003960
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record