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dc.contributor.authorMartin, F
dc.contributor.editorHeinrich, L
dc.contributor.editorMartin, F
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:08:34Z
dc.date.issued2006-12-01
dc.identifier.citationMartin, F. (2006). Stigmatic bodies: The corporeal Qiu Miaojin. Heinrich, L (Ed.). Martin, F (Ed.). Embodied Modernities: Corporeality, Representation, and Chinese Cultures, (1), pp.177-194. University of Hawaii Press.
dc.identifier.isbn0824829638
dc.identifier.isbn9780824829636
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/25803
dc.descriptionB1 - Research Book Chapters
dc.descriptionDeposited with permission of University of Hawaii Press
dc.description.abstractQiu Miaojin (1969–1995) is Taiwan’s best-known lesbian author. In local lesbian (nütongzhi) subcultures, Qiu’s books are frequently cited as classics, particularly her 1994 novel The Crocodile’s Journal (Eyu shouji), the first novel in Taiwan’s modern literary history to be written by an author commonly known to be a lesbian that takes erotic relationships between women as its central theme. Qiu’s fiction is much celebrated, too, in the mainstream literary establishment; The Crocodile’s Journal won the prestigious China Times Honorary Prize for Literature for Qiu posthumously, following her suicide in mid-1995. Qiu’s unique literary style—mingling cerebral, experimental language use, psychological realism, biting social critique through allegory, and a surrealist effect deriving from the use of arrestingly unusual metaphors—is strongly influenced by both European and Japanese literary and cinematic modernisms. Although her fiction has been compared, in its principal subject-matter, to Radclyffe Hall’s 1920s classic of lesbian alienation, The Well of Loneliness, most frequently cited in Qiu’s writings are male modernist and postmodernist ‘masters’ (many of whose work shows a strongly homoerotic aesthetic) including Andre Gide, Jean Genet, Kobo Abe, Yukio Mishima, Haruki Murakami, Andrei Tarkovsky, and Derek Jarman—locally, Qiu’s work has been critiqued for this apparent masculinist bias. Qiu’s early short stories ‘Zero Degree’ (‘Linjiedian,’ 1988) and ‘Platonic Hair’ (‘Bolatu zhi fa,’ 1990), to be discussed in this chapter, appeared in her first collection, The Revelry of Ghosts (Guide kuanghuan) in 1991, following their earlier serialization in local daily newspapers. They are Qiu’s first works to treat thematically homoerotic desire between women.
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dc.publisherUniversity of Hawaii Press
dc.subjectChinese; Culture
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectSexuality; Languages and Literature; Studies in Human Society
dc.titleStigmatic bodies: The corporeal Qiu Miaojin
dc.typeChapter
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentCulture And Communication
melbourne.source.titleEmbodied Modernities: Corporeality, Representation, and Chinese Cultures
melbourne.source.pages177-194
dc.research.coderfcd420211
dc.research.coderfcd420303
dc.research.codeseo1998751001
dc.research.codeseo1998780107
melbourne.publicationid51299
melbourne.elementsid276897
pubs.edition1
melbourne.contributor.authorMartin, Francesca
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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