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dc.contributor.authorFielding, JE
dc.contributor.authorKelly, HA
dc.contributor.authorGlass, K
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-22T04:27:53Z
dc.date.available2020-12-22T04:27:53Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-21
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-15-36652
dc.identifier.citationFielding, J. E., Kelly, H. A. & Glass, K. (2015). Transmission of the First Influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 Pandemic Wave in Australia Was Driven by Undetected Infections: Pandemic Response Implications. PLOS ONE, 10 (12), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0144331.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/258074
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: During the first wave of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Victoria, Australia the rapid increase in notified cases and the high proportion with relatively mild symptoms suggested that community transmission was established before cases were identified. This lead to the hypothesis that those with low-level infections were the main drivers of the pandemic. METHODS: A deterministic susceptible-infected-recovered model was constructed to describe the first pandemic wave in a population structured by disease severity levels of asymptomatic, low-level symptoms, moderate symptoms and severe symptoms requiring hospitalisation. The model incorporated mixing, infectivity and duration of infectiousness parameters to calculate subgroup-specific reproduction numbers for each severity level. RESULTS: With stratum-specific effective reproduction numbers of 1.82 and 1.32 respectively, those with low-level symptoms, and those with asymptomatic infections were responsible for most of the transmission. The effective reproduction numbers for infections resulting in moderate symptoms and hospitalisation were less than one. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the importance of parameters relating to asymptomatic individuals and those with low-level symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Transmission of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was largely driven by those invisible to the health system. This has implications for control measures--such as distribution of antivirals to cases and contacts and quarantine/isolation--that rely on detection of infected cases. Pandemic plans need to incorporate milder scenarios, with a graded approach to implementation of control measures.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleTransmission of the First Influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 Pandemic Wave in Australia Was Driven by Undetected Infections: Pandemic Response Implications
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0144331
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine (RMH)
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume10
melbourne.source.issue12
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1028168
melbourne.contributor.authorFielding, James
melbourne.contributor.authorFielding, Joanne
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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