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dc.contributor.authorMoore, GF
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, S
dc.contributor.authorChaplin, K
dc.contributor.authorLyons, RA
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, M
dc.contributor.authorMoore, L
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-22T04:41:06Z
dc.date.available2020-12-22T04:41:06Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-01
dc.identifierpii: S1368980013003133
dc.identifier.citationMoore, G. F., Murphy, S., Chaplin, K., Lyons, R. A., Atkinson, M. & Moore, L. (2014). Impacts of the Primary School Free Breakfast Initiative on socio-economic inequalities in breakfast consumption among 9-11-year-old schoolchildren in Wales. PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION, 17 (6), pp.1280-1289. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980013003133.
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/258119
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Universal interventions may widen or narrow inequalities if disproportionately effective among higher or lower socio-economic groups. The present paper examines impacts of the Primary School Free Breakfast Initiative in Wales on inequalities in children's dietary behaviours and cognitive functioning. DESIGN: Cluster-randomised controlled trial. Responses were linked to free school meal (FSM) entitlement via the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage databank. Impacts on inequalities were evaluated using weighted school-level regression models with interaction terms for intervention × whole-school percentage FSM entitlement and intervention × aggregated individual FSM entitlement. Individual-level regression models included interaction terms for intervention × individual FSM entitlement. SETTING: Fifty-five intervention and fifty-six wait-list control primary schools. SUBJECTS: Approximately 4500 children completed measures of dietary behaviours and cognitive tests at baseline and 12-month follow-up. RESULTS: School-level models indicated that children in intervention schools ate a greater number of healthy items for breakfast than children in control schools (b = 0·25; 95 % CI 0·07, 0·44), with larger increases observed in more deprived schools (interaction term b = 1·76; 95 % CI 0·36, 3·16). An interaction between intervention and household-level deprivation was not significant. Despite no main effects on breakfast skipping, a significant interaction was observed, indicating declines in breakfast skipping in more deprived schools (interaction term b = -0·07; 95 % CI -0·15, -0·00) and households (OR = 0·67; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·98). No significant influence on inequality was observed for the remaining outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Universal breakfast provision may reduce socio-economic inequalities in consumption of healthy breakfast items and breakfast skipping. There was no evidence of intervention-generated inequalities in any outcomes.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherCAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0
dc.titleImpacts of the Primary School Free Breakfast Initiative on socio-economic inequalities in breakfast consumption among 9-11-year-old schoolchildren in Wales
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1368980013003133
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.source.titlePublic Health Nutrition
melbourne.source.volume17
melbourne.source.issue6
melbourne.source.pages1280-1289
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC-SA
melbourne.elementsid1186128
melbourne.contributor.authorMoore, Laurence
dc.identifier.eissn1475-2727
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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