Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCripps, JK
dc.contributor.authorMartin, JK
dc.contributor.authorCoulson, G
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-22T04:54:27Z
dc.date.available2020-12-22T04:54:27Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-19
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-15-41086
dc.identifier.citationCripps, J. K., Martin, J. K. & Coulson, G. (2016). Anthelmintic Treatment Does Not Change Foraging Strategies of Female Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus. PLOS ONE, 11 (1), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0147384.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/258167
dc.description.abstractLarge mammalian herbivores are commonly infected with gastrointestinal helminths. Heavily parasitised hosts are likely to have increased nutritional requirements and would be predicted to increase their food intake to compensate for costs of being parasitised, but experimental tests of the impacts of these parasites on the foraging efficiency of hosts are lacking, particularly in free-ranging wildlife. We conducted a field experiment on a population of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) to test this prediction, removing nematodes from one group of adult females using an anthelmintic treatment. We then carried out observations before and following treatment to assess the influence of parasites on foraging behaviour. Contrary to our predictions, the manipulation of parasite burdens did not result in changes in any of the key foraging variables we measured. Our results suggest that despite carrying large burdens of gastrointestinal parasites, the foraging strategy of female kangaroos is likely be driven by factors unrelated to parasitism, and that kangaroos in high nutritional environments may be able acquire sufficient nutrients to offset the costs of parasitism. We conclude that the drivers of forage intake likely differ between domesticated and free-ranging herbivores, and that free-ranging hosts are likely more resilient to parasitism.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleAnthelmintic Treatment Does Not Change Foraging Strategies of Female Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0147384
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of BioSciences
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume11
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1032341
melbourne.contributor.authorMartin, Jennifer
melbourne.contributor.authorCoulson, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorCripps, Jemma
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record