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dc.contributor.authorPeter, M
dc.contributor.authorKohler, A
dc.contributor.authorOhm, RA
dc.contributor.authorKuo, A
dc.contributor.authorKruetzmann, J
dc.contributor.authorMorin, E
dc.contributor.authorArend, M
dc.contributor.authorBarry, KW
dc.contributor.authorBinder, M
dc.contributor.authorChoi, C
dc.contributor.authorClum, A
dc.contributor.authorCopeland, A
dc.contributor.authorGrisel, N
dc.contributor.authorHaridas, S
dc.contributor.authorKipfer, T
dc.contributor.authorLaButti, K
dc.contributor.authorLindquist, E
dc.contributor.authorLipzen, A
dc.contributor.authorMaire, R
dc.contributor.authorMeier, B
dc.contributor.authorMihaltcheva, S
dc.contributor.authorMolinier, V
dc.contributor.authorMurat, C
dc.contributor.authorPoeggeler, S
dc.contributor.authorQuandt, CA
dc.contributor.authorSperisen, C
dc.contributor.authorTritt, A
dc.contributor.authorTisserant, E
dc.contributor.authorCrous, PW
dc.contributor.authorHenrissat, B
dc.contributor.authorNehls, U
dc.contributor.authorEgli, S
dc.contributor.authorSpatafora, JW
dc.contributor.authorGrigoriev, IV
dc.contributor.authorMartin, FM
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-22T05:08:18Z
dc.date.available2020-12-22T05:08:18Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-01
dc.identifierpii: ncomms12662
dc.identifier.citationPeter, M., Kohler, A., Ohm, R. A., Kuo, A., Kruetzmann, J., Morin, E., Arend, M., Barry, K. W., Binder, M., Choi, C., Clum, A., Copeland, A., Grisel, N., Haridas, S., Kipfer, T., LaButti, K., Lindquist, E., Lipzen, A., Maire, R. ,... Martin, F. M. (2016). Ectomycorrhizal ecology is imprinted in the genome of the dominant symbiotic fungus Cenococcum geophilum. NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 7 (1), https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms12662.
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/258219
dc.description.abstractThe most frequently encountered symbiont on tree roots is the ascomycete Cenococcum geophilum, the only mycorrhizal species within the largest fungal class Dothideomycetes, a class known for devastating plant pathogens. Here we show that the symbiotic genomic idiosyncrasies of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes are also present in C. geophilum with symbiosis-induced, taxon-specific genes of unknown function and reduced numbers of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. C. geophilum still holds a significant set of genes in categories known to be involved in pathogenesis and shows an increased genome size due to transposable elements proliferation. Transcript profiling revealed a striking upregulation of membrane transporters, including aquaporin water channels and sugar transporters, and mycorrhiza-induced small secreted proteins (MiSSPs) in ectomycorrhiza compared with free-living mycelium. The frequency with which this symbiont is found on tree roots and its possible role in water and nutrient transport in symbiosis calls for further studies on mechanisms of host and environmental adaptation.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
dc.titleEctomycorrhizal ecology is imprinted in the genome of the dominant symbiotic fungus Cenococcum geophilum
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms12662
melbourne.affiliation.departmentAgriculture and Food Systems
melbourne.source.titleNature Communications
melbourne.source.volume7
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1187274
melbourne.contributor.authorCROUS, PIETER
dc.identifier.eissn2041-1723
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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