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dc.contributor.authorMine, M
dc.contributor.authorMiyata, K
dc.contributor.authorMorikawa, M
dc.contributor.authorNishi, T
dc.contributor.authorOkamoto, N
dc.contributor.authorKawasaki, R
dc.contributor.authorYamashita, H
dc.contributor.authorKurumatani, N
dc.contributor.authorOgata, N
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-22T05:27:22Z
dc.date.available2020-12-22T05:27:22Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-01
dc.identifierpii: 10.1089/biores.2016.0023
dc.identifier.citationMine, M., Miyata, K., Morikawa, M., Nishi, T., Okamoto, N., Kawasaki, R., Yamashita, H., Kurumatani, N. & Ogata, N. (2016). Association of Visual Acuity and Cognitive Impairment in Older Individuals: Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study. BIORESEARCH OPEN ACCESS, 5 (1), pp.228-234. https://doi.org/10.1089/biores.2016.0023.
dc.identifier.issn2164-7860
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/258292
dc.description.abstractBoth visual impairment and cognitive impairment are essential factors that determine the quality of life in the aged population. The aim of this study was to determine if a correlation existed between visual acuity and cognitive impairment in an elderly Japanese population. The Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study was a cross-sectional study of individuals aged ≥68 years who lived in Nara Prefecture of Japan. Participants underwent ophthalmological examinations and cognitive function test. A mild visual impairment was defined as having a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) >0.2 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) units in the better eye. Cognitive impairment was defined as having a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of ≤23 points. A total to 2818 individuals completed the examinations. The mean age of the participants was 76.3 ± 4.8 years (mean ± standard deviation). The mean BCVA of the better eye was -0.02 ± 0.13 logMAR units and 6.6% subjects were classified as being mildly visually impaired. The mean MMSE score was 27.3 ± 2.3 and 5.7% subjects were classified as being cognitively impaired. The proportion of subjects with cognitive or moderate visual impairment increased with age, and there was a significant correlation between the visual acuity and MMSE score (r = -0.10, p < 0.0001). Subjects with mild visual impairments had 2.4 times higher odds of having cognitive impairment than those without visual impairment (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval, 1.5-3.8, p < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, and length of education. We conclude that it may be important to maintain good visual acuity to reduce the risk of having cognitive impairment.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherMARY ANN LIEBERT, INC
dc.titleAssociation of Visual Acuity and Cognitive Impairment in Older Individuals: Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/biores.2016.0023
melbourne.affiliation.departmentOphthalmology (Eye & Ear Hospital)
melbourne.source.titleBioResearch Open Access
melbourne.source.volume5
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages228-234
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1190909
melbourne.contributor.authorKawasaki, Ryo
dc.identifier.eissn2164-7860
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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