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dc.contributor.authorPolaino, S
dc.contributor.authorVillalobos-Escobedo, JM
dc.contributor.authorShakya, VPS
dc.contributor.authorMiralles-Duran, A
dc.contributor.authorChaudhary, S
dc.contributor.authorSanz, C
dc.contributor.authorShahriari, M
dc.contributor.authorLuque, EM
dc.contributor.authorEslava, AP
dc.contributor.authorCorrochano, LM
dc.contributor.authorHerrera-Estrella, A
dc.contributor.authorIdnurm, A
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-22T05:52:52Z
dc.date.available2020-12-22T05:52:52Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-21
dc.identifierpii: srep44790
dc.identifier.citationPolaino, S., Villalobos-Escobedo, J. M., Shakya, V. P. S., Miralles-Duran, A., Chaudhary, S., Sanz, C., Shahriari, M., Luque, E. M., Eslava, A. P., Corrochano, L. M., Herrera-Estrella, A. & Idnurm, A. (2017). A Ras GTPase associated protein is involved in the phototropic and circadian photobiology responses in fungi. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 7 (1), https://doi.org/10.1038/srep44790.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/258376
dc.description.abstractLight is an environmental signal perceived by most eukaryotic organisms and that can have major impacts on their growth and development. The MadC protein in the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus (Mucoromycotina) has been postulated to form part of the photosensory input for phototropism of the fruiting body sporangiophores, but the madC gene has remained unidentified since the 1960s when madC mutants were first isolated. In this study the madC gene was identified by positional cloning. All madC mutant strains contain loss-of-function point mutations within a gene predicted to encode a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for Ras. The madC gene complements the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ras-GAP ira1 mutant and the encoded MadC protein interacts with P. blakesleeanus Ras homologs in yeast two-hybrid assays, indicating that MadC is a regulator of Ras signaling. Deletion of the homolog in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa affects the circadian clock output, yielding a pattern of asexual conidiation similar to a ras-1 mutant that is used in circadian studies in N. crassa. Thus, MadC is unlikely to be a photosensor, yet is a fundamental link in the photoresponses from blue light perceived by the conserved White Collar complex with Ras signaling in two distantly-related filamentous fungal species.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleA Ras GTPase associated protein is involved in the phototropic and circadian photobiology responses in fungi
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep44790
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of BioSciences
melbourne.source.titleScientific Reports
melbourne.source.volume7
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1196590
melbourne.contributor.authorIdnurm, Alexander
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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