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dc.contributor.authorde Bruin, L
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-18T08:42:41Z
dc.date.available2021-01-18T08:42:41Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-08
dc.identifier.citationde Bruin, L. (2021). Instrumental Music Educators in a COVID landscape: a reassertion of relationality and connection in teaching practice. Frontiers in Psychology, 11, https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.624717.
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/258743
dc.description.abstractFor many countries instrumental music tuition in secondary schools is a ubiquitous event that provides situated and personalized instruction in the learning of an instrument. Opportunities and methods through which teachers operate during the COVID-19 outbreak challenged music educators as to how they taught, engaged, and interacted with students across online platforms, with alarm over aerosol dispersement a major factor in maintaining online instrumental music tuition even as students returned to “normal” face to face classes. This qualitative study investigated the practices employed by instrumental music educators in secondary schools in Melbourne, Australia, analyzing teacher perspectives to music tuition amidst the restriction of interaction with students remotely via online means. Thematic analysis of the interview transcripts revealed music educational approaches that fostered connection, empathy and receptiveness to relationship-building, guiding students in slower and deeper learner-centered approaches, asserting pedagogical practices that reinforced and promoted interpersonal connectedness in and through musical experience and discovery. These findings provide a framework for how music educators can facilitate connection, motivation and student autonomy generating personal meaning and commitment to music making and the learning relationship, which can translate to significant student learning and value in the learning music. Exploring teachers’ pedagogical practices and behaviors within this dyadic teacher-student relationship is a significant addition to the literature, enabling the consideration of the type of connective behaviors required to stimulate and develop long-term interest in music.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherFrontiers Media
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleInstrumental Music Educators in a COVID landscape: a reassertion of relationality and connection in teaching practice
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2020.624717
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Conservatorium of Music
melbourne.source.titleFrontiers in Psychology
melbourne.source.volume11
melbourne.source.pages624717-
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1489374
melbourne.openaccess.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.624717/full
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7840537
melbourne.openaccess.statusPublished version
melbourne.contributor.authorde Bruin, Leon
dc.identifier.eissn1664-1078
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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