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dc.contributor.authorRahman, MS
dc.contributor.authorSchefe, C
dc.contributor.authorRajput, S
dc.contributor.authorKeizer, D
dc.contributor.authorWeatherley, A
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-22T01:32:06Z
dc.date.available2021-01-22T01:32:06Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationRahman, M. S., Schefe, C., Rajput, S., Keizer, D. & Weatherley, A. (2021). O-aryl and Carbonyl Carbon Contents of Food Waste and Biosolid Predict P Availability in an Acidic Soil. Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, 4, https://doi.org/10.3389/fsufs.2020.609788.
dc.identifier.issn2571-581X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/258777
dc.description.abstractOrganic waste streams, otherwise known as organic amendments (OA), contain potentially valuable nutrients which may additionally increase legacy nutrient availability in soil. This is particularly the case for phosphorus (P) where declining reserves of rock phosphate add an extra dimension to their utility. In acidic soils, OA have been reported to increase P availability through the action of O-aryl and carbonyl groups (represent organic acid compounds) by substituting previously fixed, legacy P and forming organometallic complexes to reduce P sorption. This study aimed to investigate if signature P (orthophosphate) and C (O-aryl and carbonyl) content of OA could be used to predict soil P availability, to replace traditional ways of testing OA and also for future prescriptive applications. Food waste and biosolid were the sources of OA in this study, with pyrolysis and composting processes used to create a range of functional groups. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was utilized to identify forms of C (solid-state 13C NMR) and P compounds (solution-state 31P NMR) in these OA. The O-aryl, carbonyl, and orthophosphate content were higher in pyrolysis and composted materials compared to their feedstock substrate. The effect of OA addition on soil P availability was monitored in a 110-day laboratory incubation study. Results showed an increase in soil P availability (Olsen P) and a decrease in soil P buffering capacity (PBC) after incubation. The increase in soil P availability was not predicted well by the NMR-derived orthophosphate content of OA, which may be due to the overestimation of plant-available orthophosphate content by the solution-state 31P NMR. Furthermore, an additional increase in soil ΔOlsen P (difference between observed and expected) was obtained above the Olsen P added from OA indicating substitution of previously fixed soil P. Both indices of P availability namely ΔOlsen P (r = 0.63–0.83) and ΔPBC (difference between treatment—control) (r = −0.50 to −0.80) showed strong (but opposite) correlations with the ratio of O-aryl to carbonyl C content of OA. It was concluded that the ratio of O-aryl and carbonyl C content of OA could be used to predict the P availability in acidic soil.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SA
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleO-aryl and Carbonyl Carbon Contents of Food Waste and Biosolid Predict P Availability in an Acidic Soil
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fsufs.2020.609788
melbourne.affiliation.departmentBio21
melbourne.source.titleFrontiers in Sustainable Food Systems
melbourne.source.volume4
melbourne.source.pages609788-
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1490420
melbourne.contributor.authorKeizer, David
melbourne.contributor.authorRajput, Sunnia
melbourne.contributor.authorWeatherley, Anthony
dc.identifier.eissn2571-581X
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidUNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNANO AUSTRALIA PTY LTD
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidUNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE, CRC-P57347
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidCOOMBOONA HOLDINGS PTY LTD, CRC-P57347
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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