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dc.contributor.authorRuppanner, L
dc.contributor.authorTan, X
dc.contributor.authorScarborough, W
dc.contributor.authorLandivar, LC
dc.contributor.authorCollins, C
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-03T03:58:55Z
dc.date.available2021-02-03T03:58:55Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationRuppanner, L., Tan, X., Scarborough, W., Landivar, L. C. & Collins, C. (2021). Shifting Inequalities? Parents’ Sleep, Anxiety, and Calm during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Australia and the United States. Men and Masculinities, 24 (1), pp.181-188. https://doi.org/10.1177/1097184x21990737.
dc.identifier.issn1097-184X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/258913
dc.description.abstractAs a cultural ideal, hegemonic masculinity positions men as breadwinners in the gender order—a position that systematically benefits men and disadvantages women. Because economic success is key to performing masculinity (Connell 2005), the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic fallout offer an opportunity to evaluate shifting gender dynamics amidst rapid changes in employment and domestic demands for heterosexual couples with children. Closures of schools, daycare facilities, and workplaces around the world shifted more paid and unpaid work into the home, leading journalists and academics to question whether the pandemic would be a catalyst to “un-stall” the gender revolution. Specifically, they wondered if men would take on more domestic work, generating a more equal gender division of household labor (Smith and Johnson 2020). In this essay, we argue that traditional gender roles were reinforced for U.S. parents but were eroded for Australian parents—with disparate consequences for their well-being during the first few months of the pandemic.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.titleShifting Inequalities? Parents’ Sleep, Anxiety, and Calm during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Australia and the United States
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1097184x21990737
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of Social and Political Sciences
melbourne.source.titleMen and Masculinities
melbourne.source.volume24
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages181-188
melbourne.elementsid1493182
melbourne.openaccess.urlhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1097184X21990737
melbourne.openaccess.statusPublished version
melbourne.contributor.authorTan, Xiao
melbourne.contributor.authorRuppanner, Leah
dc.identifier.eissn1552-6828
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently unavailable from this repository


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