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dc.contributor.authorBryant, RA
dc.contributor.authorFoord, R
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T00:42:07Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T00:42:07Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-15
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-16-05544
dc.identifier.citationBryant, R. A. & Foord, R. (2016). Activating Attachments Reduces Memories of Traumatic Images. PLOS ONE, 11 (9), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0162550.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259169
dc.description.abstractEmotional memories, and especially intrusive memories, are a common feature of many psychological disorders, and are overconsolidated by stress. Attachment theory posits that activation of mental representations of attachment figures can reduce stress and boost coping. This study tested the proposition that attachment activation would reduce consolidation of emotional and intrusive memories. Sixty-seven undergraduate students viewed subliminal presentations of traumatic and neutral images, which were preceded by subliminal presentations of either attachment-related images or non-attachment-related images; free recall and intrusive memories were assessed two days later. Participants with low avoidant attachment tendencies who received the attachment primes recalled fewer memories and reported fewer intrusions than those who received the non-attachment primes. Unexpectedly, those with high anxious attachment tendencies reported fewer memories. These findings generally accord with attachment theory, and suggest that consolidation of emotional memories can be moderated by activation of attachment representations.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.titleActivating Attachments Reduces Memories of Traumatic Images
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0162550
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPsychiatry
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume11
melbourne.source.issue9
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1202972
melbourne.contributor.authorBryant, Richard
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNational Health and Medical Research Council, APP1073041
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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