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dc.contributor.authorCarreras-Torres, R
dc.contributor.authorHaycock, PC
dc.contributor.authorRelton, CL
dc.contributor.authorMartin, RM
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GD
dc.contributor.authorKraft, P
dc.contributor.authorGao, C
dc.contributor.authorTworoger, S
dc.contributor.authorLe Marchand, L
dc.contributor.authorWilkens, LR
dc.contributor.authorPark, SL
dc.contributor.authorHaiman, C
dc.contributor.authorField, JK
dc.contributor.authorDavies, M
dc.contributor.authorMarcus, M
dc.contributor.authorLiu, G
dc.contributor.authorCaporaso, NE
dc.contributor.authorChristiani, DC
dc.contributor.authorWei, Y
dc.contributor.authorChen, C
dc.contributor.authorDoherty, JA
dc.contributor.authorSeveri, G
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, GE
dc.contributor.authorHung, RJ
dc.contributor.authorAmos, CI
dc.contributor.authorMcKay, J
dc.contributor.authorJohansson, M
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, P
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T00:47:41Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T00:47:41Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-04
dc.identifierpii: srep31121
dc.identifier.citationCarreras-Torres, R., Haycock, P. C., Relton, C. L., Martin, R. M., Smith, G. D., Kraft, P., Gao, C., Tworoger, S., Le Marchand, L., Wilkens, L. R., Park, S. L., Haiman, C., Field, J. K., Davies, M., Marcus, M., Liu, G., Caporaso, N. E., Christiani, D. C., Wei, Y. ,... Brennan, P. (2016). The causal relevance of body mass index in different histological types of lung cancer: A Mendelian randomization study.. Sci Rep, 6 (1), pp.31121-. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep31121.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259193
dc.description.abstractBody mass index (BMI) is inversely associated with lung cancer risk in observational studies, even though it increases the risk of several other cancers, which could indicate confounding by tobacco smoking or reverse causality. We used the two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) approach to circumvent these limitations of observational epidemiology by constructing a genetic instrument for BMI, based on results from the GIANT consortium, which was evaluated in relation to lung cancer risk using GWAS results on 16,572 lung cancer cases and 21,480 controls. Results were stratified by histological subtype, smoking status and sex. An increase of one standard deviation (SD) in BMI (4.65 Kg/m(2)) raised the risk for lung cancer overall (OR = 1.13; P = 0.10). This was driven by associations with squamous cell (SQ) carcinoma (OR = 1.45; P = 1.2 × 10(-3)) and small cell (SC) carcinoma (OR = 1.81; P = 0.01). An inverse trend was seen for adenocarcinoma (AD) (OR = 0.82; P = 0.06). In stratified analyses, a 1 SD increase in BMI was inversely associated with overall lung cancer in never smokers (OR = 0.50; P = 0.02). These results indicate that higher BMI may increase the risk of certain types of lung cancer, in particular SQ and SC carcinoma.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleThe causal relevance of body mass index in different histological types of lung cancer: A Mendelian randomization study.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep31121
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleScientific Reports
melbourne.source.volume6
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages31121-
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1203816
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4973233
melbourne.contributor.authorSeveri, Gianluca
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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