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dc.contributor.authorVia, A
dc.contributor.authorBlicher, T
dc.contributor.authorBongcam-Rudloff, E
dc.contributor.authorBrazas, MD
dc.contributor.authorBrooksbank, C
dc.contributor.authorBudd, A
dc.contributor.authorDe Las Rivas, J
dc.contributor.authorDreyer, J
dc.contributor.authorFernandes, PL
dc.contributor.authorvan Gelder, C
dc.contributor.authorJacob, J
dc.contributor.authorJimenez, RC
dc.contributor.authorLoveland, J
dc.contributor.authorMoran, F
dc.contributor.authorMulder, N
dc.contributor.authorNyroenen, T
dc.contributor.authorRother, K
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, MV
dc.contributor.authorAttwood, TK
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T01:12:58Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T01:12:58Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-01
dc.identifierpii: bbt043
dc.identifier.citationVia, A., Blicher, T., Bongcam-Rudloff, E., Brazas, M. D., Brooksbank, C., Budd, A., De Las Rivas, J., Dreyer, J., Fernandes, P. L., van Gelder, C., Jacob, J., Jimenez, R. C., Loveland, J., Moran, F., Mulder, N., Nyroenen, T., Rother, K., Schneider, M. V. & Attwood, T. K. (2013). Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists. BRIEFINGS IN BIOINFORMATICS, 14 (5), pp.528-537. https://doi.org/10.1093/bib/bbt043.
dc.identifier.issn1467-5463
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259295
dc.description.abstractThe mountains of data thrusting from the new landscape of modern high-throughput biology are irrevocably changing biomedical research and creating a near-insatiable demand for training in data management and manipulation and data mining and analysis. Among life scientists, from clinicians to environmental researchers, a common theme is the need not just to use, and gain familiarity with, bioinformatics tools and resources but also to understand their underlying fundamental theoretical and practical concepts. Providing bioinformatics training to empower life scientists to handle and analyse their data efficiently, and progress their research, is a challenge across the globe. Delivering good training goes beyond traditional lectures and resource-centric demos, using interactivity, problem-solving exercises and cooperative learning to substantially enhance training quality and learning outcomes. In this context, this article discusses various pragmatic criteria for identifying training needs and learning objectives, for selecting suitable trainees and trainers, for developing and maintaining training skills and evaluating training quality. Adherence to these criteria may help not only to guide course organizers and trainers on the path towards bioinformatics training excellence but, importantly, also to improve the training experience for life scientists.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESS
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleBest practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bib/bbt043
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleBriefings in Bioinformatics
melbourne.source.volume14
melbourne.source.issue5
melbourne.source.pages528-537
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1061161
melbourne.contributor.authorSchneider, Maria Victoria
dc.identifier.eissn1477-4054
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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