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dc.contributor.authorKowalski, GM
dc.contributor.authorHamley, S
dc.contributor.authorSelathurai, A
dc.contributor.authorKloehn, J
dc.contributor.authorDe Souza, DP
dc.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, S
dc.contributor.authorNijagal, B
dc.contributor.authorTull, DL
dc.contributor.authorMcConville, MJ
dc.contributor.authorBruce, CR
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T01:19:29Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T01:19:29Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-07
dc.identifierpii: srep27541
dc.identifier.citationKowalski, G. M., Hamley, S., Selathurai, A., Kloehn, J., De Souza, D. P., O'Callaghan, S., Nijagal, B., Tull, D. L., McConville, M. J. & Bruce, C. R. (2016). Reversing diet-induced metabolic dysregulation by diet switching leads to altered hepatic de novo lipogenesis and glycerolipid synthesis. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 6 (1), https://doi.org/10.1038/srep27541.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259325
dc.description.abstractIn humans, low-energy diets rapidly reduce hepatic fat and improve/normalise glycemic control. Due to difficulties in obtaining human liver, little is known about changes to the lipid species and pathway fluxes that occur under these conditions. Using a combination of stable isotope, and targeted metabolomic approaches we investigated the acute (7-9 days) hepatic effects of switching high-fat high-sucrose diet (HFD) fed obese mice back to a chow diet. Upon the switch, energy intake was reduced, resulting in reductions of fat mass and hepatic triacyl- and diacylglycerol. However, these parameters were still elevated compared to chow fed mice, thus representing an intermediate phenotype. Nonetheless, glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia were completely normalized. The diet reversal resulted in marked reductions in hepatic de novo lipogenesis when compared to the chow and HFD groups. Compared with HFD, glycerolipid synthesis was reduced in the reversal animals, however it remained elevated above that of chow controls, indicating that despite experiencing a net loss in lipid stores, the liver was still actively esterifying available fatty acids at rates higher than that in chow control mice. This effect likely promotes the re-esterification of excess free fatty acids released from the breakdown of adipose depots during the weight loss period.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleReversing diet-induced metabolic dysregulation by diet switching leads to altered hepatic de novo lipogenesis and glycerolipid synthesis
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep27541
melbourne.affiliation.departmentBiochemistry and Molecular Biology
melbourne.affiliation.departmentBio21
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyAffiliate
melbourne.source.titleScientific Reports
melbourne.source.volume6
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc1059530
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1067009
melbourne.contributor.authorMcConville, Malcolm
melbourne.contributor.authorKLOEHN, JOACHIM
melbourne.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, Sean
melbourne.contributor.authorde Souza, David
melbourne.contributor.authorNijagal, Brunda
melbourne.contributor.authorTull, Dedreia
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 1059530
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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