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dc.contributor.authorFinnanger, TG
dc.contributor.authorOlsen, A
dc.contributor.authorSkandsen, T
dc.contributor.authorLydersen, S
dc.contributor.authorVik, A
dc.contributor.authorEvensen, KAI
dc.contributor.authorCatroppa, C
dc.contributor.authorHaberg, AK
dc.contributor.authorAndersson, S
dc.contributor.authorIndredavik, MS
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T01:23:37Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T01:23:37Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-01
dc.identifier.citationFinnanger, T. G., Olsen, A., Skandsen, T., Lydersen, S., Vik, A., Evensen, K. A. I., Catroppa, C., Haberg, A. K., Andersson, S. & Indredavik, M. S. (2015). Life after Adolescent and Adult Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Self-Reported Executive, Emotional, and Behavioural Function 2-5 Years after Injury. BEHAVIOURAL NEUROLOGY, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/329241.
dc.identifier.issn0953-4180
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259347
dc.description.abstractSurvivors of moderate-severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) are at risk for long-term cognitive, emotional, and behavioural problems. This prospective cohort study investigated self-reported executive, emotional, and behavioural problems in the late chronic phase of moderate and severe TBI, if demographic characteristics (i.e., age, years of education), injury characteristics (Glasgow Coma Scale score, MRI findings such as traumatic axonal injury (TAI), or duration of posttraumatic amnesia), symptoms of depression, or neuropsychological variables in the first year after injury predicted long-term self-reported function. Self-reported executive, emotional, and behavioural functioning were assessed among individuals with moderate and severe TBI (N = 67, age range 15-65 years at time of injury) 2-5 years after TBI, compared to a healthy matched control group (N = 72). Results revealed significantly more attentional, emotional regulation, and psychological difficulties in the TBI group than controls. Demographic and early clinical variables were associated with poorer cognitive and emotional outcome. Fewer years of education and depressive symptoms predicted greater executive dysfunction. Younger age at injury predicted more aggressive and rule-breaking behaviour. TAI and depressive symptoms predicted Internalizing problems and greater executive dysfunction. In conclusion, age, education, TAI, and depression appear to elevate risk for poor long-term outcome, emphasising the need for long-term follow-up of patients presenting with risk factors.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherHINDAWI LTD
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleLife after Adolescent and Adult Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Self-Reported Executive, Emotional, and Behavioural Function 2-5 Years after Injury
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2015/329241
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleBehavioural Neurology: an international journal on the relationship between disordered human behavior and underlying biological mechanisms
melbourne.source.volume2015
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1211951
melbourne.contributor.authorCatroppa, Agata
dc.identifier.eissn1875-8584
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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